Leafed



[leeft] /lift/

adjective
1.
having ; leaved.
[leef] /lif/
noun, plural leaves
[leevz] /livz/ (Show IPA)
1.
one of the expanded, usually green organs borne by the stem of a plant.
2.
any similar or corresponding lateral outgrowth of a stem.
3.
a petal:
a rose leaf.
4.
leaves collectively; foliage.
5.
Bibliography. a unit generally comprising two printed, blank, or illustrated pages of a book, one on each side.
6.
a thin sheet of metal:
silver leaf.
7.
a lamina or layer.
8.
a sliding, hinged, or detachable flat part, as of a door or tabletop.
9.
a section of a drawbridge.
10.
a single strip of metal in a .
11.
a tooth of a small gear wheel, as of a pinion.
12.
.
13.
Textiles. (def 14).
verb (used without object)
14.
to put forth leaves.
15.
to turn pages, especially quickly (usually followed by through):
to leaf through a book.
verb (used with object)
16.
to thumb or turn, as the pages of a book or magazine, in a casual or cursory inspection of the contents.
Idioms
17.
in leaf, covered with foliage; having leaves:
the pale green tint of the woods newly in leaf.
18.
take a leaf out of / from someone’s book, to follow someone’s example; imitate:
Some countries that took a leaf out of American industry’s book are now doing very well for themselves.
19.
turn over a new leaf, to begin anew; make a fresh start:
Every New Year’s we make resolutions to turn over a new leaf.
/liːf/
noun (pl) leaves (liːvz)
1.
the main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher plants, usually consisting of a flat green blade attached to the stem directly or by a stalk related adjectives foliar foliate
2.
foliage collectively
3.
in leaf, (of shrubs, trees, etc) having a full complement of foliage leaves
4.
one of the sheets of paper in a book
5.
a hinged, sliding, or detachable part, such as an extension to a table
6.
metal in the form of a very thin flexible sheet: gold leaf
7.
a foil or thin strip of metal in a composite material; lamina
8.
short for leaf spring
9.
the inner or outer wall of a cavity wall
10.
a crop that is harvested in the form of leaves
11.
a metal strip forming one of the laminations in a leaf spring
12.
a slang word for marijuana
13.
take a leaf out of someone’s book, take a leaf from someone’s book, to imitate someone, esp in one particular course of action
14.
turn over a new leaf, to begin a new and improved course of behaviour
verb
15.
when intr, usually foll by through. to turn (through pages, sheets, etc) cursorily
16.
(intransitive) (of plants) to produce leaves
n.

Old English leaf “leaf of a plant; page of a book,” from Proto-Germanic *laubaz (cf. Old Saxon lof, Old Norse lauf, Old Frisian laf, Dutch loof, Old High German loub, German Laub “foliage, leaves,” Gothic lauf), perhaps from PIE *leup- “to peel off, break off” (cf. Lithuanian luobas, Old Church Slavonic lubu “bark, rind”). Extended 15c. to very thin sheets of metal (especially gold). Meaning “hinged flap on the side of a table” is from 1550s.
v.

“to turn over (the pages of a book),” 1660s, from leaf (n.). The notion of a book page also is in the phrase to turn over a (new) leaf (1570s). Related: Leafed; leaved; leafing.
leaf
(lēf)

An appendage growing from the stem of a plant. Leaves are extremely variable in form and function according to species. For example, the needles of pine trees, the spines of cacti, and the bright red parts of the poinsettia plant are all leaves modified for different purposes. However, most leaves are flat and green and adapted to capturing sunlight and carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. They consist of an outer tissue layer (the epidermis) through which water and gases are exchanged, a spongy inner layer of cells that contain chloroplasts, and veins that supply water and minerals and carry out food. Some leaves are simple, while others are compound, consisting of multiple leaflets. The flat part of the leaf, the blade, is often attached to the stem by a leafstalk.

of a tree. The olive-leaf mentioned Gen. 8:11. The barren fig-tree had nothing but leaves (Matt. 21:19; Mark 11:13). The oak-leaf is mentioned Isa. 1:30; 6:13. There are numerous allusions to leaves, their flourishing, their decay, and their restoration (Lev. 26:36; Isa. 34:4; Jer. 8:13; Dan. 4:12, 14, 21; Mark 11:13; 13:28). The fresh leaf is a symbol of prosperity (Ps. 1:3; Jer. 17:8; Ezek. 47:12); the faded, of decay (Job 13:25; Isa. 1:30; 64:6; Jer. 8:13). Leaf of a door (1 Kings 6:34), the valve of a folding door. Leaf of a book (Jer. 36:23), perhaps a fold of a roll.

In addition to the idiom beginning with
leaf

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