[leg-uh-see] /ˈlɛg ə si/

noun, plural legacies.
Law. a gift of property, especially personal property, as money, by will; a bequest.
anything handed down from the past, as from an ancestor or predecessor:
the legacy of ancient Rome.
an applicant to or student at a school that was attended by his or her parent.
Obsolete. the office, function, or commission of a legate.
of or relating to old or outdated computer hardware, software, or data that, while still functional, does not work well with up-to-date systems.
noun (pl) -cies
a gift by will, esp of money or personal property
something handed down or received from an ancestor or predecessor
(modifier) surviving computer systems, hardware, or software: legacy network, legacy application

late 14c., “body of persons sent on a mission,” from Old French legatie “legate’s office,” from Medieval Latin legatia, from Latin legatus “ambassador, envoy,” noun use of past participle of legare “appoint by a last will, send as a legate” (see legate). Sense of “property left by will” appeared in Scottish mid-15c.

legacy system


Read Also:

  • Legacy application

    noun any computer program that has been around for many years, often referring to large, expensive mainframe or minicomputer programs

  • Legacy software

    legacy system

  • Legal-age

    noun 1. the age at which a person acquires full legal rights and responsibilities, such as the right to make contracts and deeds.

  • Legal-aid

    noun 1. free legal service to persons unable to pay for a lawyer. noun 1. a means-tested benefit in the form of financial assistance for persons to meet the cost of advice and representation in legal proceedings

Disclaimer: Legacy definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.