Letted



[let-id] /ˈlɛt ɪd/

verb
1.
a simple past tense and past participle of 2 .
[let] /lɛt/
verb (used with object), let, letting.
1.
to allow or permit:
to let him escape.
2.
to allow to pass, go, or come:
to let us through.
3.
to grant the occupancy or use of (land, buildings, rooms, space, etc., or movable property) for rent or hire (sometimes followed by out).
4.
to contract or assign for performance, usually under a contract:
to let work to a carpenter.
5.
to cause to; make:
to let one know the truth.
6.
(used in the imperative as an auxiliary expressive of a request, command, warning, suggestion, etc.):
Let me see. Let us go. Just let them try it!
verb (used without object), let, letting.
7.
to admit of being rented or leased:
The apartment lets for $100 per week.
noun
8.
British. a lease.
Verb phrases
9.
let down,

10.
let in,

11.
let off,

12.
let on,

13.
let out,

14.
let up,

15.
let up on, to treat less severely; be more lenient with:
He refused to let up on the boy until his grades improved.
Idioms
16.
let alone. (def 8).
17.
let be,

18.
let go. 1 (def 93).
19.
let someone have it, Informal. to attack or assault, as by striking, shooting, or rebuking:
The gunman threatened to let the teller have it if he didn’t move fast.
[let] /lɛt/
noun
1.
(in tennis, badminton, etc.) any play that is voided and must be replayed, especially a service that hits the net and drops into the proper part of the opponent’s court.
2.
Chiefly Law. an impediment or obstacle:
to act without let or hindrance.
verb (used with object), letted or let, letting.
3.
Archaic. to hinder, prevent, or obstruct.
/lɛt/
verb (transitive; usually takes an infinitive without to or an implied infinitive) lets, letting, let
1.
to permit; allow: she lets him roam around
2.
(imperative or dependent imperative)

3.

4.
to allow or cause the movement of (something) in a specified direction: to let air out of a tyre
5.
(Irish, informal) to utter: to let a cry
6.
let alone

7.
let go, See go1 (sense 59)
8.
let loose

noun
9.
(Brit) the act of letting property or accommodation: the majority of new lets are covered by the rent regulations
/lɛt/
noun
1.
an impediment or obstruction (esp in the phrase without let or hindrance)
2.
(tennis, squash)

verb lets, letting, letted, let
3.
(transitive) (archaic) to hinder; impede
v.

Old English lætan “to allow to remain; let go, leave, depart from; leave undone; to allow; bequeath,” also “to rent” (class VII strong verb; past tense let, past participle læten), from Proto-Germanic *letan (cf. Old Saxon latan, Old Frisian leta, Dutch laten, German lassen, Gothic letan “to leave, let”), from PIE *le- “to let go, slacken” (cf. Latin lassus “faint, weary,” Lithuanian leisti “to let, to let loose;” see lenient). If that derivation is correct, the primary sense would be “let go through weariness, neglect.”

Of blood, from late Old English. To let (something) slip originally (1520s) was a reference to hounds on a leash; figurative use from 1540s. To let (someone) off “allow to go unpunished” is from 1814. To let on “reveal, divulge” is from 1725; to let up “cease, stop” is from 1787. Let alone “not to mention” is from 1812.
n.

“stoppage, obstruction” (obsolete unless in legal contracts), late 12c., from archaic verb letten “to hinder,” from Old English lettan “hinder, delay,” from Proto-Germanic *latjanan (cf. Old Saxon lettian “to hinder,” Old Norse letja “to hold back,” Old High German lezzen “to stop, check,” Gothic latjan “to hinder, make late,” Old English læt “sluggish, slow, late”); see late.
linear energy transfer

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