Letter



[let-er] /ˈlɛt ər/

noun
1.
a written or printed communication addressed to a person or organization and usually transmitted by mail.
2.
a symbol or character that is conventionally used in writing and printing to represent a speech sound and that is part of an alphabet.
3.
a piece of printing type bearing such a symbol or character.
4.
a particular style of type.
5.
such types collectively.
6.
Often, letters. a formal document granting a right or privilege.
7.
actual terms or wording; literal meaning, as distinct from implied meaning or intent (opposed to ):
the letter of the law.
8.
letters, (used with a singular or plural verb)

9.
an emblem consisting of the initial or monogram of a school, awarded to a student for extracurricular activity, especially in athletics.
verb (used with object)
10.
to mark or write with letters; inscribe.
verb (used without object)
11.
to earn a letter in an interscholastic or intercollegiate activity, especially a sport:
He lettered in track at Harvard.
Idioms
12.
to the letter, to the last particular; precisely:
His orders were carried out to the letter.
[let-er] /ˈlɛt ər/
noun, Chiefly British.
1.
a person who lets, especially one who rents out property.
/ˈlɛtə/
noun
1.
any of a set of conventional symbols used in writing or printing a language, each symbol being associated with a group of phonetic values in the language; character of the alphabet
2.
a written or printed communication addressed to a person, company, etc, usually sent by post in an envelope related adjective epistolary
3.
the letter, the strict legalistic or pedantic interpretation of the meaning of an agreement, document, etc; exact wording as distinct from actual intention (esp in the phrase the letter of the law) Compare spirit1 (sense 10)
4.
(printing, archaic) a style of typeface: a fancy letter
5.
to the letter

verb
6.
to write or mark letters on (a sign, etc), esp by hand
7.
(transitive) to set down or print using letters
n.

c.1200, “graphic symbol, alphabetic sign, written character,” from Old French letre (10c., Modern French lettre) “character, letter; missive, note,” in plural, “literature, writing, learning,” from Latin littera (also litera) “letter of the alphabet,” of uncertain origin, perhaps via Etruscan from Greek diphthera “tablet,” with change of d- to l- as in lachrymose. In this sense it replaced Old English bocstæf, literally “book staff” (cf. German Buchstabe “letter, character,” from Old High German buohstab, from Proto-Germanic *bok-staba-m).

Latin littera also meant “a writing, document, record,” and in plural litteræ “a letter, epistle,” a sense first attested in English early 13c., replacing Old English ærendgewrit, literally “errand-writing.” The Latin plural also meant “literature, books,” and figuratively “learning, liberal education, schooling” (see letters). School letter in sports, attested by 1908, were said to have been first awarded by University of Chicago football coach Amos Alonzo Stagg. Expression to the letter “precisely” is from 1520s (earlier as after the letter). Letter-perfect is from 1845, originally in theater jargon, in reference to an actor knowing the lines exactly. Letter-press, in reference to matter printed from relief surfaces, is from 1840.

“one who lets” in any sense, c.1400, agent noun from let (v.).
v.

“to write in letters,” 1660s, from letter (n.1). Earlier it meant “to instruct” (mid-15c.). Related: Lettered; lettering.

Related Terms

dead horse, french letter, poison-pen letter, red-letter day

in Rom. 2:27, 29 means the outward form. The “oldness of the letter” (7:6) is a phrase which denotes the old way of literal outward obedience to the law as a system of mere external rules of conduct. In 2 Cor. 3:6, “the letter” means the Mosaic law as a written law. (See WRITING.)

In addition to the idiom beginning with
letter

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Letterbomb

    messaging 1. An e-mail message containing live data intended to do nefarious things to the recipient’s computer or terminal. It is possible, for example, to send letterbombs that will lock up some specific kinds of terminals when they are viewed, so thoroughly that the user must turn the terminal off to unwedge it. Under Unix, […]

  • Letter-bomb

    noun 1. an envelope containing an explosive device designed to detonate when the envelope is opened by the recipient. noun 1. a thin explosive device inside an envelope, detonated when the envelope is opened



  • Letterbox

    [let-er-boks] /ˈlɛt ərˌbɒks/ noun 1. Also, letter box. Chiefly British. a public or private mailbox. 2. a technique for displaying a wide-screen film on a regular-format television screen by reducing its size but retaining the aspect ratio, with black bands filling the screen above and below the picture. Compare . verb To show a wide-screen […]

  • Letterboxing

    /ˈlɛtəˌbɒksɪŋ/ noun 1. a method of formatting film that enables all of a wide-screen film to be transmitted on a television screen, resulting in a blank strip of screen above and below the picture 2. a type of treasure hunt in which a box, known as a letterbox, is hidden in a remote rural location […]



Disclaimer: Letter definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.