Liked



[lahyk] /laɪk/

verb (used with object), liked, liking.
1.
to take pleasure in; find agreeable or congenial:
We all liked the concert.
2.
to regard with favor; have a kindly or friendly feeling for (a person, group, etc.); find attractive:
His parents like me and I like them.
3.
to wish or prefer:
You can do exactly as you like while you are a guest here.
4.
Digital Technology. (sometimes initial capital letter) to indicate one’s enjoyment of, agreement with, or interest in (website content, especially in social media): Share your posts so your friends can like them or leave a comment.
Like us on Facebook to get a free sample.
verb (used without object), liked, liking.
5.
to feel inclined; wish:
We’ll have lunch whenever you like.
6.
Archaic. to suit the tastes or wishes; please.
noun
7.
Usually, likes. the things a person likes:
a long list of likes and dislikes.
8.
Digital Technology. (sometimes initial capital letter)

adjective
9.
Digital Technology. (sometimes initial capital letter) noting or pertaining to a feature used to like specific website content: a Like button;
like boxes.
Idioms
10.
would like. 1 (def 10).
/laɪk/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) similar; resembling
preposition
2.
similar to; similarly to; in the manner of: acting like a maniac, he’s so like his father
3.
used correlatively to express similarity in certain proverbs: like mother, like daughter
4.
such as: there are lots of ways you might amuse yourself — like taking a long walk, for instance
adverb
5.
a dialect word for likely
6.
(not standard) as it were: often used as a parenthetic filler: there was this policeman just staring at us, like
7.
(informal) be like …, used to introduce direct speech or nonverbal communication: I was like, ‘You’re kidding!’
conjunction
8.
(not standard) as though; as if: you look like you’ve just seen a ghost
9.
in the same way as; in the same way that: she doesn’t dance like you do
noun
10.
the equal or counterpart of a person or thing, esp one respected or prized: compare like with like, her like will never be seen again
11.
the like, similar things: dogs, foxes, and the like
12.
the likes of, the like of, people or things similar to (someone or something specified): we don’t want the likes of you around here
/laɪk/
verb
1.
(transitive) to find (something) enjoyable or agreeable or find it enjoyable or agreeable (to do something): he likes boxing, he likes to hear music
2.
(transitive) to be fond of
3.
(transitive) to prefer or wish (to do something): we would like you to go
4.
(transitive) to feel towards; consider; regard: how did she like it?
5.
(intransitive) to feel disposed or inclined; choose; wish
6.
(transitive) (archaic) to please; agree with: it likes me not to go
noun
7.
(usually pl) a favourable feeling, desire, preference, etc (esp in the phrase likes and dislikes)
adj.

“having the same characteristics or qualities” (as another), Middle English shortening of Old English gelic “like, similar,” from Proto-Germanic *galika- “having the same form,” literally “with a corresponding body” (cf. Old Saxon gilik, Dutch gelijk, German gleich, Gothic galeiks “equally, like”), a compound of *ga- “with, together” + Germanic base *lik- “body, form; like, same” (cf. Old English lic “body,” German Leiche “corpse,” Danish lig, Swedish lik, Dutch lijk “body, corpse”). Analogous, etymologically, to Latin conform. The modern form (rather than *lich) may be from a northern descendant of the Old English word’s Norse cognate, glikr.

Formerly with comparative liker and superlative likest (still in use 17c.). The preposition (c.1200) and the adverb (c.1300) both are from the adjective. As a conjunction, first attested early 16c. The word has been used as a postponed filler (“going really fast, like”) from 1778; as a presumed emphatic (“going, like, really fast”) from 1950, originally in counterculture slang and bop talk. Phrase more like it “closer to what is desired” is from 1888.
v.

Old English lician “to please, be sufficient,” from Proto-Germanic *likjan (cf. Old Norse lika, Old Frisian likia, Old High German lihhen, Gothic leikan “to please”), from *lik- “body, form; like, same.”

The basic meaning seems to be “to be like” (see like (adj.)), thus, “to be suitable.” Like (and dislike) originally flowed the other way: It likes me, where we would say I like it. The modern flow began to appear late 14c. (cf. please).
n.

c.1200, “a similar thing” (to another), from like (adj.).

adverb

As if; really; you know; sort of •A generalized

modifier

used to lend a somewhat tentative and detached tone to the speaker, to give the speaker time to rally words and ideas: Like I was like groovin’ like, you know what I mean? (1950s+ Counterculture & bop talk)

verb

To pick; bet on: I liked Felton. I took his folder and read it again (1950s+)

Related Terms

make like

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Like death warmed over

    adverb Looking quite pathetic, tired or ill: after that nap, looking like death warmed over see: look like death

  • Like fuck

    adverb phrase like mad: coding like fuck every day (1990s+)



  • Like greased lightning

    adverb phrase Very rapidly; like a streak: The little car went by like greased lightning (1833+) Also, like a blue streak; like the wind; like blazes. Very fast indeed, as in He climbed that ladder like greased lightning, or She kept on talking like a blue streak, or The children ran like the wind when […]

  • Like it or lump it

    adverb phrase Whether or not one wishes: We have to go now, like it or lump it (1833+) Also, if you don’t like it you can lump it. Whether or not you want to, as in Like it or lump it, we’re staying home this summer. The origin of lump in this idiom is unclear; […]



Disclaimer: Liked definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.