Link



[lingk] /lɪŋk/

noun
1.
one of the rings or separate pieces of which a chain is composed.
2.
anything serving to connect one part or thing with another; a bond or tie:
The locket was a link with the past.
3.
a unit in a communications system, as a radio relay station or a television booster station.
4.
any of a series of sausages in a chain.
5.
a cuff link.
6.
a ring, loop, or the like:
a link of hair.
7.
Computers. an object, as text or graphics, linked through hypertext to a document, another object, etc.
8.
Surveying, Civil Engineering.

9.
Chemistry. 1 (def 15).
10.
Machinery. a rigid, movable piece or rod, connected with other parts by means of pivots or the like, for the purpose of transmitting motion.
verb (used with or without object)
11.
to join by or as if by a link or links; connect; unite (often followed by up):
The new bridge will link the island to the mainland. The company will soon link up with a hotel chain.
[lingk] /lɪŋk/
noun
1.
a torch, especially of tow and pitch.
/lɪŋk/
noun
1.
any of the separate rings, loops, or pieces that connect or make up a chain
2.
something that resembles such a ring, loop, or piece
3.
a road, rail, air, or sea connection, as between two main routes
4.
a connecting part or episode
5.
a connecting piece in a mechanism, often having pivoted ends
6.
Also called radio link. a system of transmitters and receivers that connect two locations by means of radio and television signals
7.
a unit of length equal to one hundredth of a chain. 1 link of a Gunter’s chain is equal to 7.92 inches, and of an engineer’s chain to 1 foot
8.
(computing) short for hyperlink
9.
weak link, an unreliable person or thing within an organization or system
verb
10.
(often foll by up) to connect or be connected with or as if with links
11.
(transitive) to connect by association, etc
/lɪŋk/
noun
1.
(formerly) a torch used to light dark streets
n.

early 15c., “one of a series of rings or loops which form a chain; section of a cord,” probably from Old Norse *hlenkr or a similar Scandinavian source (cf. Old Norse hlekkr “link,” Old Swedish lænker “chain, link,” Norwegian lenke, Danish lænke), from Proto-Germanic *khlink- (cf. German lenken “to bend, turn, lead,” gelenk “articulation, joint, link,” Old English hlencan (plural) “armor”), from PIE root *kleng- “to bend, turn.” Missing link between man and apes dates to 1880.

“torch,” 1520s, of uncertain origin, possibly from Medieval Latin linchinus, from lichinus “wick,” from Greek lykhnos “portable light, lamp.”
v.

“bind, fasten, to couple,” late 14c., believed to be from link (n.), though it is attested earlier. Related: Linked; linking.
link
(lĭngk)
A segment of text or a graphical item that serves as a cross-reference between parts of a webpage or other hypertext documents or between webpages or other hypertext documents.

1. hard link or symbolic link.
2. hypertext link.
(1997-10-22)

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