Loather



[lohth, lohth] /loʊθ, loʊð/

adjective
1.
unwilling; reluctant; disinclined; averse:
to be loath to admit a mistake.
[lohth] /loʊð/
verb (used with object), loathed, loathing.
1.
to feel disgust or intense aversion for; abhor:
I loathe people who spread malicious gossip.
/ləʊθ/
adjective
1.
(usually foll by to) reluctant or unwilling
2.
nothing loath, willing
/ləʊð/
verb
1.
(transitive) to feel strong hatred or disgust for
adj.

Old English lað “hated; hateful; hostile; repulsive,” from Proto-Germanic *laithaz (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian leth “loathsome,” Old Norse leiðr “hateful, hostile, loathed;” Middle Dutch lelijc, Dutch leelijk “ugly;” Old High German leid “sorrowful, hateful, offensive, grievous,” German Leid “sorrow;” French laid “ugly,” from Frankish *laid), from PIE root *leit- “to detest.”

Weakened meaning “averse, disinclined” is attested from late 14c. Loath to depart, a line from some long-forgotten song, is recorded since 1580s as a generic term expressive of any tune played at farewells, the sailing of a ship, etc. Related: Loathness.
v.

Old English laðian “to hate, to be disgusted with,” from lað “hostile” (see loath). Cognate with Old Saxon lethon, Old Norse leiða. Related: Loathed; loathing.

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  • Loathful

    [lohth -fuh l] /ˈloʊð fəl/ adjective 1. Scot. bashful; reluctant. 2. hateful; loathsome.

  • Loathing

    [loh-th ing] /ˈloʊ ðɪŋ/ noun 1. strong dislike or disgust; intense aversion. [lohth] /loʊð/ verb (used with object), loathed, loathing. 1. to feel disgust or intense aversion for; abhor: I loathe people who spread malicious gossip. /ˈləʊðɪŋ/ noun 1. abhorrence; disgust /ləʊð/ verb 1. (transitive) to feel strong hatred or disgust for n. “abhorrence,” mid-14c., […]



  • Loathly

    [lohth-lee, lohth -] /ˈloʊθ li, ˈloʊð-/ adverb 1. reluctantly; unwillingly. [lohth -lee, lohth-] /ˈloʊð li, ˈloʊθ-/ adjective, Archaic. 1. loathsome; hideous; repulsive. /ˈləʊθlɪ/ adverb 1. with reluctance; unwillingly /ˈləʊðlɪ/ adjective 1. an archaic word for loathsome adj. Old English laðlic “hateful, horrible, unpleasant;” see loath + -ly (2). As an adverb, Old English laðlice.

  • Loathsome

    [lohth -suh m, lohth-] /ˈloʊð səm, ˈloʊθ-/ adjective 1. causing feelings of ; disgusting; revolting; repulsive: a loathsome skin disease. /ˈləʊðsəm/ adjective 1. causing loathing; abhorrent adj. c.1300, “foul, detestable,” from loath in its older, stronger sense + -some (1). Related: Loathsomely; loathsomeness.



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