Looked



[loo k] /lʊk/

verb (used without object)
1.
to turn one’s eyes toward something or in some direction in order to see:
He looked toward the western horizon and saw the returning planes.
2.
to glance or gaze in a manner specified:
to look questioningly at a person.
3.
to use one’s sight or vision in seeking, searching, examining, watching, etc.:
to look through the papers.
4.
to tend, as in bearing or significance:
Conditions look toward war.
5.
to appear or seem to the eye as specified:
to look pale.
6.
to appear or seem to the mind:
The case looks promising.
7.
to direct attention or consideration:
to look at the facts.
8.
to have an or afford a view:
The window looks upon the street.
9.
to face or front:
The house looks to the east.
verb (used with object)
10.
to give (someone) a look:
He looked me straight in the eye.
11.
to have an appearance appropriate to or befitting (something):
She looked her age.
12.
to appear to be; look like:
He looked a perfect fool, coming to the party a day late.
13.
to express or suggest by looks:
to look one’s annoyance at a person.
14.
Archaic. to bring, put, etc., by looks.
noun
15.
the act of looking:
a look of inquiry.
16.
a visual search or examination.
17.
the way in which a person or thing appears to the eye or to the mind; aspect:
He has the look of an honest man. The tablecloth has a cheap look.
18.
an expressive glance:
to give someone a sharp look.
19.
looks.

Verb phrases
20.
look after,

21.
look back, to review past events; return in thought:
When I look back on our school days, it seems as if they were a century ago.
22.
look down on/upon, to regard with scorn or disdain; have contempt for:
They look down on all foreigners.
23.
look for,

24.
look in,

25.
look into, to inquire into; investigate; examine:
The auditors are looking into the records to find the cause of the discrepancy.
26.
look on/upon,

27.
look out,

28.
look out for, to take watchful care of; be concerned about:
He has to look out for his health.
29.
look over, to examine, especially briefly:
Will you please look over my report before I submit it?
30.
look to,

31.
look up,

32.
look up to, to regard with admiration or respect; esteem:
A boy needs a father he can look up to.
Idioms
33.
look daggers, to look at someone with a furious, menacing expression:
I could see my partner looking daggers at me.
34.
look down one’s nose at, to regard with an overbearing attitude of superiority, disdain, or censure:
The more advanced students really looked down their noses at the beginners.
35.
look forward to, to anticipate with eagerness or pleasure:
I always look forward to your visits.
36.
look sharp,

/lʊk/
verb (mainly intransitive)
1.
(often foll by at) to direct the eyes (towards): to look at the sea
2.
(often foll by at) to direct one’s attention (towards): let’s look at the circumstances
3.
(often foll by to) to turn one’s interests or expectations (towards): to look to the future
4.
(copula) to give the impression of being by appearance to the eye or mind; seem: that looks interesting
5.
to face in a particular direction: the house looks north
6.
to expect, hope, or plan (to do something): I look to hear from you soon, he’s looking to get rich
7.
(foll by for)

8.
(foll by to)

9.
to be a pointer or sign: these early inventions looked towards the development of industry
10.
(foll by into) to carry out an investigation: to look into a mystery
11.
(transitive) to direct a look at (someone) in a specified way: she looked her rival up and down
12.
(transitive) to accord in appearance with (something): to look one’s age
13.
look alive, look lively, hurry up; get busy
14.
look daggers, See dagger (sense 4)
15.
look here, an expression used to attract someone’s attention, add emphasis to a statement, etc
16.
(imperative) look sharp, look smart, to hurry up; make haste
17.
not look at, to refuse to consider: they won’t even look at my offer of £5000
18.
not much to look at, unattractive; plain
noun
19.
the act or an instance of looking: a look of despair
20.
a view or sight (of something): let’s have a look
21.
(often pl) appearance to the eye or mind; aspect: the look of innocence, I don’t like the looks of this place
22.
style; fashion: the new look for summer
sentence connector
23.
an expression demanding attention or showing annoyance, determination, etc: look, I’ve had enough of this
v.

Old English locian “use the eyes for seeing, gaze, look, behold, spy,” from West Germanic *lokjan (cf. Old Saxon lokon “see, look, spy,” Middle Dutch loeken “to look,” Old High German luogen, German dialectal lugen “to look out”), of unknown origin, perhaps cognate with Breton lagud “eye.” In Old English, usually with on; the use of at began 14c. Meaning “seek, search out” is c.1300; meaning “to have a certain appearance” is from c.1400. Of objects, “to face in a certain direction,” late 14c.

Look after “take care of” is from late 14c., earlier “to seek” (c.1300), “to look toward” (c.1200). Look into “investigate” is from 1580s; look up “research in books or papers” is from 1690s. To look down upon in the figurative sense is from 1711; to look down one’s nose is from 1921. To look forward “anticipate” is c.1600; meaning “anticipate with pleasure” is mid-19c. To not look back “make no pauses” is colloquial, first attested 1893. In look sharp (1711) sharp originally was an adverb, “sharply.”
n.

c.1200, “act or action of looking,” from look (v.). Meaning “appearance of a person” is from late 14c. Expression if looks could kill … attested by 1827 (if looks could bite is attested from 1747).

Related Terms

a hard look

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    [loo k-er] /ˈlʊk ər/ noun 1. a person who . 2. Informal. a very attractive person. /ˈlʊkə/ noun (informal) 1. a person who looks 2. a very attractive person, esp a woman or girl n. Old English locere “one engaged in looking,” agent noun from look (v.). Meaning “one who watches over” is from c.1300; […]



  • Looker-on

    [loo k-er-on, -awn] /ˌlʊk ərˈɒn, -ˈɔn/ noun, plural lookers-on. 1. a person who looks on; onlooker; witness; spectator.

  • Look-in

    [loo k-in] /ˈlʊkˌɪn/ noun 1. a brief glance. 2. a short visit. 3. Football. a quick pass play in which the ball is thrown to a receiver running a short diagonal pattern across the center of the field. noun 1. a chance to be chosen, participate, etc 2. a short visit verb 3. (intransitive, adverb) […]



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