Lumber



[luhm-ber] /ˈlʌm bər/

noun
1.
timber sawed or split into planks, boards, etc.
2.
miscellaneous useless articles that are stored away.
verb (used without object)
3.
to cut timber and prepare it for market.
4.
to become useless or to be stored away as useless.
verb (used with object)
5.
to convert (a specified amount, area, etc.) into lumber:
We lumbered more than a million acres last year.
6.
to heap together in disorder.
7.
to fill up or obstruct with miscellaneous useless articles; encumber.
[luhm-ber] /ˈlʌm bər/
verb (used without object)
1.
to move clumsily or heavily, especially from great or ponderous bulk:
overloaded wagons lumbering down the dirt road.
2.
to make a rumbling noise.
/ˈlʌmbə/
noun
1.
(mainly US & Canadian)

2.
(Brit)

verb
3.
(transitive) to pile together in a disorderly manner
4.
(transitive) to fill up or encumber with useless household articles
5.
(mainly US & Canadian) to convert (the trees) of (a forest) into marketable timber
6.
(transitive) (Brit, informal) to burden with something unpleasant, tedious, etc
7.
(transitive) (Austral) to arrest; imprison
/ˈlʌmbə/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to move awkwardly
2.
an obsolete word for rumble
n.

“timber sawn into rough planks,” 1660s, American English (Massachusetts), earlier “disused bit of furniture; heavy, useless objects” (1550s), probably from lumber (v.), perhaps influenced by Lombard, from the Italian immigrants famous as pawnbrokers and money-lenders in England (see Lombard). Lumbar, Lumbard were old alternative forms of Lombard in English. The evolution of sense then would be because a lumber-house (“pawn shop”) naturally accumulates odds and ends of furniture.

Live Lumber; soldiers or passengers on board a ship are so called by the sailors.

LUMBER HOUSE. A house appropriated by thieves for the reception of their stolen property. [“Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence,” London, 1811]

v.

“to move clumsily,” c.1300, lomere, probably from a Scandinavian source (cf. dialectal Swedish loma “move slowly, walk heavily,” Old Norse lami “lame”), ultimately cognate with lame (adj.). Related: Lumbered; lumbering.

noun

A bat (1940s+ Baseball)

verb

To take advantage of someone; make someone a scapegoat •Chiefly British: He was totally lumbered. It was a terrible travesty (1845+)

[verb sense fr lumber, ”to fill up or obstruct with lumber,” found by 1642]

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  • Lumbered

    [luhm-ber] /ˈlʌm bər/ noun 1. timber sawed or split into planks, boards, etc. 2. miscellaneous useless articles that are stored away. verb (used without object) 3. to cut timber and prepare it for market. 4. to become useless or to be stored away as useless. verb (used with object) 5. to convert (a specified amount, […]

  • Lumber facial

    noun phrase A blow to the face with a hockey stick: That cementhead gave him a lumber facial, but the ref didn’t call it (1990s+ Hockey)



  • Lumbering

    [luhm-ber-ing] /ˈlʌm bər ɪŋ/ noun 1. the trade or business of cutting and preparing . [luhm-ber] /ˈlʌm bər/ noun 1. timber sawed or split into planks, boards, etc. 2. miscellaneous useless articles that are stored away. verb (used without object) 3. to cut timber and prepare it for market. 4. to become useless or to […]

  • Lumberjack

    [luhm-ber-jak] /ˈlʌm bərˌdʒæk/ noun 1. a person who works at ; logger. 2. . 3. Canadian. the gray jay. /ˈlʌmbəˌdʒæk/ noun 1. (esp in North America) a person whose work involves felling trees, transporting the timber, etc n. 1831, Canadian English, from lumber (n.) + Jack.



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