Mould



[mohld] /moʊld/

noun
1.
a hollow form or matrix for giving a particular shape to something in a molten or plastic state.
2.
the shape created or imparted to a thing by a mold.
3.
something formed in or on a mold:
a mold of jelly.
4.
a frame on which something is formed or made.
5.
shape or form.
6.
a prototype, example, or precursor.
7.
a distinctive nature, character, or type:
a person of a simple mold.
8.
Shipbuilding.

9.
Architecture.

verb (used with object)
10.
to work into a required shape or form; shape.
11.
to shape or form in or on a mold.
12.
Metallurgy. to form a mold of or from, in order to make a casting.
13.
to produce by or as if by shaping material; form.
14.
to have influence in determining or forming:
to mold the character of a child.
15.
to ornament with moldings.
[mohld] /moʊld/
noun
1.
a growth of minute fungi forming on vegetable or animal matter, commonly as a downy or furry coating, and associated with decay or dampness.
2.
any of the fungi that produce such a growth.
verb (used with or without object)
3.
to become or cause to become overgrown or covered with mold.
[mohld] /moʊld/
noun
1.
loose, friable earth, especially when rich in organic matter and favorable to the growth of plants.
2.
British Dialect. ground; earth.
/məʊld/
noun
1.
a shaped cavity used to give a definite form to fluid or plastic material
2.
a frame on which something may be constructed
3.
something shaped in or made on a mould
4.
shape, form, design, or pattern
5.
specific nature, character, or type: heroic mould
verb (transitive)
6.
to make in a mould
7.
to shape or form, as by using a mould
8.
to influence or direct: to mould opinion
9.
to cling to: the skirt moulds her figure
10.
(metallurgy) to make (a material such as sand) into a mould that is used in casting
/məʊld/
noun
1.
a coating or discoloration caused by various saprotrophic fungi that develop in a damp atmosphere on the surface of stored food, fabrics, wallpaper, etc
2.
any of the fungi that causes this growth
verb
3.
to become or cause to become covered with this growth
/məʊld/
noun
1.
loose soil, esp when rich in organic matter
2.
(poetic) the earth
/məʊld/
noun, verb
1.
the US spelling of mould1

chiefly British English spelling of mold in various senses. Related: Moulded; moulding.
n.

also mould, “hollow shape,” c.1200, originally “fashion, form; nature, native constitution, character,” metathesized from Old French modle “model, plan, copy; way, manner” (12c., Modern French moule), from Latin modulum (nominative modulus) “measure, model,” diminutive of modus “manner” (see mode (1)). From c.1300 as “pattern or model by which something is shaped or made.” To break the mold “render impossible the creation of another” is from 1560s.

also mould, “furry fungus,” early 15c., probably from moulde, past participle of moulen “to grow moldy” (early 13c.), related to Old Norse mygla “grow moldy,” possibly from Proto-Germanic *(s)muk- indicating “wetness, slipperiness,” from PIE *meug- (see mucus). Or it might have evolved from (or been influenced by) Old English molde “loose earth” (see mold (n.3)).

also mould, “loose earth,” Old English molde “earth, sand, dust, soil; land, country, world,” from Proto-Germanic *mulda (cf. Old Frisian molde “earth, soil,” Old Norse mold “earth,” Middle Dutch moude, Dutch moude, Old High German molta “dust, earth,” Gothic mulda “dust”), from PIE root *mele- “to rub, grind” (see meal (n.2)). Specifically, since late (Christian) Old English, “the earth of the grave.”
v.

also mould, mid-14c., “to mix, blend;” late 14c. “to knead, shape,” from mold (n.1). Figurative sense (of character, etc.) is from c.1600. Related: Molded; molding.

mold 1 (mōld)
n.

v. mold·ed, mold·ing, molds

mold’a·ble adj.

mold 2
n.
Any of various filamentous fungi, generally a circular colony having a woolly or furry appearance, that grow on the surface of organic matter and contribute to its disintegration.
mold
(mōld)
Any of various fungi that often form a fuzzy growth (called a mycelium) on the surface of organic matter. Some molds cause food to spoil, but others are beneficial, such as those used to make certain cheeses and those from which antibiotics like penicillin are developed. The molds do not form a distinct phylogenetic grouping but belong to various phyla including the ascomycetes and the zygomycetes. See also slime mold.
see: cast in the same mold

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    [mohld] /moʊld/ noun 1. a hollow form or matrix for giving a particular shape to something in a molten or plastic state. 2. the shape created or imparted to a thing by a mold. 3. something formed in or on a mold: a mold of jelly. 4. a frame on which something is formed or […]



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