Never



[nev-er] /ˈnɛv ər/

adverb
1.
not ever; at no time:
Such an idea never occurred to me.
2.
not at all; absolutely not:
never mind; This will never do.
3.
to no extent or degree:
He was never the wiser for his experience.
Idioms
4.
never mind, don’t bother; don’t concern yourself.
/ˈnɛvə/
adverb, sentence substitute
1.
at no time; not ever
2.
certainly not; by no means; in no case
interjection
3.
Also well I never!. surely not!
adv.

Old English næfre “never,” compound of ne “not, no” (from PIE root *ne- “no, not;” see un-) + æfre “ever” (see ever). Early used as an emphatic form of not (as still in never mind). Old English, unlike its modern descendant, had the useful custom of attaching ne to words to create their negatives, as in nabban for na habban “not to have.”

Italian giammai, French jamais, Spanish jamas are from Latin iam “already” + magis “more;” thus literally “at any time, ever,” originally with a negative, but this has been so thoroughly absorbed in sense as to be formally omitted.

Phrase never say die “don’t despair” is from 1818. Never Never Land is first attested in Australia as a name for the uninhabited northern part of Queensland (1884), perhaps so called because anyone who had gone there once never wished to return. Meaning “imaginary, illusory or utopian place” first attested 1900 in American English.

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  • Never a dull moment

    Something is always changing or happening, as in First Lauren spits up, then she coughs, then she sneezes—never a dull moment with this baby! This expression was first recorded in 1889.

  • Neverending

    [nev-er-en-ding] /ˌnɛv ərˈɛn dɪŋ/ adjective 1. having or likely to have no end: never-ending worry. adjective 1. having or seeming to have no end; interminable adj. also neverending, 1660s, from never + present participle of end (v.).



  • Never-ending

    [nev-er-en-ding] /ˌnɛv ərˈɛn dɪŋ/ adjective 1. having or likely to have no end: never-ending worry. adjective 1. having or seeming to have no end; interminable adj. also neverending, 1660s, from never + present participle of end (v.).

  • Never fear

    Don’t worry that a thing will or won’t occur, be confident, as in I’ll get there, never fear. This phrase was used by Christopher Marlowe in Doctor Faustus (c. 1590): “’Tis but a surfeit; never fear, man.”



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