Neville chamberlain

(Arthur) Neville, 1869–1940, British statesman: prime minister 1937–40.
Joseph, 1836–1914, British statesman (father of Sir Austen and Neville Chamberlain).
Sir (Joseph) Austen, 1863–1937, British statesman: Nobel Peace Prize 1925.
Owen, 1920–2006, U.S. physicist: Nobel Prize 1959.
Wilt(on Norman) (“Wilt the Stilt”) 1936–1999, U.S. basketball player.
Contemporary Examples

(With Barack Obama perhaps making a cameo as neville chamberlain).
What Was Netanyahu Thinking? Peter Beinart January 21, 2013

More radios were sold while British Prime Minister neville chamberlain and others met with Hitler than ever before.
When Mars Attacked 75 Years Ago—And Everyone Believed It Marc Wortman October 28, 2013

British Prime Minister neville chamberlain hailed the result of the agreement as “peace for our time.”
Putin Toys With Obama as Syria Burns and Snowden Runs Free Garry Kasparov July 1, 2013

Besides his admiration for Soviet double agents, he was a neville chamberlain man.
My Professor, the Spy Tom Murray June 8, 2009

Hell, neville chamberlain thought his September 1938 meeting in Munich with the Germans was fruitful.
Day 13: Wall St. Happy With Fiscal Cliff Negotiations, But Skeptics See Photo-Op Daniel Gross November 18, 2012

Historical Examples

Sir neville chamberlain was still in camp, and I was sorry to find him suffering greatly from his wound.
Forty-one years in India Frederick Sleigh Roberts

From the camp below Sir neville chamberlain watches the fight.
Barclay of the Guides Herbert Strang

He then volunteered to lead a party of the Irregulars, but this offer was also refused, though backed up by neville chamberlain.
Twelve Years of a Soldier’s Life in India W. S. R. Hodson

Fortunately, neville chamberlain has arrived, and he ought to be worth a thousand men to us.
Twelve Years of a Soldier’s Life in India W. S. R. Hodson

neville chamberlain was available, and there was a general consensus of opinion that he should be appointed.
Forty-one years in India Frederick Sleigh Roberts

an officer who manages the household of a king
the steward of a nobleman or landowner
the treasurer of a municipal corporation
Sir (Joseph) Austen. 1863–1937, British Conservative statesman; foreign secretary (1924–29); awarded a Nobel peace prize for his negotiation of the Locarno Pact (1925)
his father, Joseph. 1836–1914, British statesman; originally a Liberal, he resigned in 1886 over Home Rule for Ireland and became leader of the Liberal Unionists; a leading advocate of preferential trading agreements with members of the British Empire
his son, (Arthur) Neville. 1869–1940, British Conservative statesman; prime minister (1937–40): pursued a policy of appeasement towards Germany; following the German invasion of Poland, he declared war on Germany on Sept 3, 1939
Owen. 1920–2006, US physicist, who discovered the antiproton. Nobel prize for physics jointly with Emilio Segré 1959

early 13c., from Old French chamberlenc “chamberlain, steward, treasurer” (Modern French chambellan), from a Germanic source (perhaps Frankish *kamerling; cf. Old High German chamarling, German Kämmerling), from Latin camera “chamber, room” (see camera) + Germanic diminutive suffix -ling.

a confidential servant of the king (Gen. 37:36; 39:1). In Rom. 16:23 mention is made of “Erastus the chamberlain.” Here the word denotes the treasurer of the city, or the quaestor, as the Romans styled him. He is almost the only convert from the higher ranks of whom mention is made (comp. Acts 17:34). Blastus, Herod’s “chamberlain” (Acts 12:20), was his personal attendant or valet-de-chambre. The Hebrew word _saris_, thus translated in Esther 1:10, 15; 2:3, 14, 21, etc., properly means an eunuch (as in the marg.), as it is rendered in Isa. 39:7; 56:3.


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