[nahys] /naɪs/

adjective, nicer, nicest.
pleasing; agreeable; delightful:
a nice visit.
amiably pleasant; kind:
They are always nice to strangers.
characterized by, showing, or requiring great accuracy, precision, skill, tact, care, or delicacy:
nice workmanship; a nice shot; a nice handling of a crisis.
showing or indicating very small differences; minutely accurate, as instruments:
a job that requires nice measurements.
minute, fine, or subtle:
a nice distinction.
having or showing delicate, accurate perception:
a nice sense of color.
refined in manners, language, etc.:
Nice people wouldn’t do such things.
virtuous; respectable; decorous:
a nice girl.
suitable or proper:
That was not a nice remark.
carefully neat in dress, habits, etc.
(especially of food) dainty or delicate.
having fastidious, finicky, or fussy tastes:
They’re much too nice in their dining habits to enjoy an outdoor barbecue.
Obsolete. coy, shy, or reluctant.
Obsolete. unimportant; trivial.
Obsolete. .
make nice, to behave in a friendly, ingratiating, or conciliatory manner.
nice and, sufficiently:
It’s nice and warm in here.
pleasant or commendable: a nice day
kind or friendly: a nice gesture of help
good or satisfactory: they made a nice job of it
subtle, delicate, or discriminating: a nice point in the argument
precise; skilful: a nice fit
(rare) fastidious; respectable: he was not too nice about his methods

nice and, pleasingly: it’s nice and cool
/French nis/
a city in SE France, on the Mediterranean: a leading resort of the French Riviera; founded by Phocaeans from Marseille in about the 3rd century bc. Pop: 342 738 (1999)
noun acronym
(in Britain) National Institute for Clinical Excellence: a body established in 1999 to provide authoritative guidance on current best practice in medicine and to promote high-quality cost-effective medical treatment in the NHS

early 14c., “foolishly,” from nice + -ly (2). From c.1600 as “scrupulously;” 1714 as “in an agreeable fashion.”

late 13c., “foolish, stupid, senseless,” from Old French nice (12c.) “careless, clumsy; weak; poor, needy; simple, stupid, silly, foolish,” from Latin nescius “ignorant, unaware,” literally “not-knowing,” from ne- “not” (see un-) + stem of scire “to know” (see science). “The sense development has been extraordinary, even for an adj.” [Weekley] — from “timid” (pre-1300); to “fussy, fastidious” (late 14c.); to “dainty, delicate” (c.1400); to “precise, careful” (1500s, preserved in such terms as a nice distinction and nice and early); to “agreeable, delightful” (1769); to “kind, thoughtful” (1830).

“In many examples from the 16th and 17th centuries it is difficult to say in what particular sense the writer intended it to be taken.” [OED]

By 1926, it was pronounced “too great a favorite with the ladies, who have charmed out of it all its individuality and converted it into a mere diffuser of vague and mild agreeableness.” [Fowler]

“I am sure,” cried Catherine, “I did not mean to say anything wrong; but it is a nice book, and why should I not call it so?”
“Very true,” said Henry, “and this is a very nice day, and we are taking a very nice walk; and you are two very nice young ladies. Oh! It is a very nice word indeed! It does for everything.” [Jane Austen, “Northanger Abbey,” 1803]

Nice [(nees)]

City in southeastern France on the Mediterranean Sea.

Note: Nice is the most famous resort of the French Riviera.

Related Terms

make nice
National Institute for Consumer Education


Read Also:

  • Nicene

    [nahy-seen, nahy-seen] /naɪˈsin, ˈnaɪ sin/ adjective 1. of or relating to Nicaea. /ˈnaɪsiːn/ adjective 1. of or relating to Nicaea, an ancient city in NW Asia Minor, or its inhabitants adj. early 15c., in reference to Nicaea (Greek Nikaia, modern Turkish Isnik), city in Bithynia where ecclesiastical council of 325 C.E. dealt with the Arian […]

  • Nicene-council

    noun 1. either of two church councils that met at Nicaea, the first in a.d. 325 to deal with the Arian heresy, the second in a.d. 787 to consider the question of the veneration of images. noun 1. the first council of Nicaea, the first general council of the Church, held in 325 ad to […]

  • Nicene-creed

    noun 1. a formal statement of the chief tenets of Christian belief, adopted by the first Nicene Council. 2. a later creed of closely similar form (Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed or Constantinopolitan Creed) referred, perhaps erroneously, to the Council of Constantinople (a.d. 381), received universally in the Eastern Church and, with an addition introduced in the 6th […]

  • Nice-nelly

    [nahys-nel-ee] /ˈnaɪsˈnɛl i/ adjective 1. characterized by prudishness or excessive modesty: The entrance of his nice-nelly friend stopped the flow of risqué stories. 2. being a euphemism; euphemistic: nice-nelly expressions. [nel-ee] /ˈnɛl i/ noun 1. a person who professes or exhibits excessive modesty, prudishness, or the like: too much of a nice nelly to have […]

Disclaimer: Nicely definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.