Nicked



[nik] /nɪk/

noun
1.
a small notch, groove, chip, or the like, cut into or existing in something.
2.
a hollow place produced in an edge or surface, as of a dish, by breaking, chipping, or the like:
I didn’t notice those tiny nicks in the vase when I bought it.
3.
a small dent or wound.
4.
a small groove on one side of the shank of a printing type, serving as a guide in setting or to distinguish different types.
5.
Biochemistry. a break in one strand of a double-stranded DNA or RNA molecule.
6.
British Slang. .
verb (used with object)
7.
to cut into or through:
I nicked my chin while shaving.
8.
to hit or injure slightly.
9.
to make a nick or nicks in (something); notch, groove, or chip.
10.
to record by means of a notch or notches.
11.
to incise certain tendons at the root of (a horse’s tail) to give it a higher carrying position; make an incision under the tail of (a horse).
12.
to hit, guess, catch, etc., exactly.
13.
Slang. to trick, cheat, or defraud:
How much did they nick you for that suit?
14.
British Slang.

Idioms
15.
in the nick of time, at the right or vital moment, usually at the last possible moment:
The fire engines arrived in the nick of time.
/nɪk/
noun
1.
a small notch or indentation on an edge or surface
2.
a groove on the shank of a printing type, used to orientate type and often to distinguish the fount
3.
(Brit) a slang word for prison, police station
4.
(informal) in good nick, in good condition
5.
in the nick of time, at the last possible moment; at the critical moment
verb
6.
(transitive) to chip or cut
7.
(transitive) (slang, mainly Brit)

8.
(informal) (intransitive) often foll by off. to move or depart rapidly
9.
to divide and reset (certain of the tail muscles of a horse) to give the tail a high carriage
10.
(transitive) to guess, catch, etc, exactly
11.
(intransitive) (of breeding stock) to mate satisfactorily
12.
(US & Canadian, slang) nick someone for, to defraud someone to the extent of
/nɪk/
noun
1.
(computing) an alias adopted by a member of a chatroom or forum; nickname

masc. proper name, familiar form of Nicholas. As “the devil” by 1640s, but the reason for it is obscure.
n.

“notch, groove, slit,” late 15c., nyke, of unknown origin, possibly influenced by Middle French niche (see niche), or from it. Nick of time is first attested 1640s (nick of opportunity is 1610s), possibly from an old custom of recording time as it passed by making notches on a tally stick, though nick in the general sense of “critical moment” is older (1570s, Hanmer, who adds “as commonly we say”) than the phrase.
v.

1520s, “to make a notch in,” from nick (n.). Sense of “to steal” is from 1869, probably from earlier slang sense of “to catch, take unawares, arrest” (1620s). The precise sense connection is unclear. Related: Nicked; nicking.

noun

nickel bag (1990s+ Narcotics)

verb

Nickelodeon (cable television channel)
see: in the nick of time

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    [nik-uh l] /ˈnɪk əl/ noun 1. Chemistry. a hard, silvery-white, ductile and malleable metallic element, allied to iron and cobalt, not readily oxidized: used chiefly in alloys, in electroplating, and as a catalyst in organic synthesis. Symbol: Ni; atomic weight: 58.71; atomic number: 28; specific gravity: 8.9 at 20°C. 2. a coin of the U.S., […]

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    noun, Chemistry. 1. a green, crystalline, water-soluble solid, C 4 H 6 NiO 4 , used chiefly in nickel-plating.



  • Nickel-and-dime

    [nik-uh l-uh n-dahym] /ˈnɪk əl ənˈdaɪm/ Informal. adjective 1. of little or no importance; trivial; petty: a nickel-and-dime business that soon folded. verb (used with object), nickel-and-dimed or nickeled-and-dimed, nickel-and-diming or nickeling-and-diming. 2. to expose to financial hardship or bankruptcy by the accumulation of small expenses, bills, etc.: We’re being nickel-and-dimed to death by these […]

  • Nickelback

    noun phrase The fifth backfield player in the ”nickel defense”: When peace was restored, the officiating crew ejected end Tom Briggs and nickel back Leroy Axem (1980s+ Football)



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