Nominative



[nom-uh-nuh-tiv, nom-nuh- or for 2, 3, nom-uh-ney-tiv] /ˈnɒm ə nə tɪv, ˈnɒm nə- or for 2, 3, ˈnɒm əˌneɪ tɪv/

adjective
1.
Grammar.

2.
nominated; appointed by nomination.
3.
made out in a person’s name, as a certificate or security.
noun, Grammar.
4.
the nominative case.
5.
a word in the nominative case.
6.
a form or construction of similar function or meaning.
/ˈnɒmɪnətɪv; ˈnɒmnə-/
adjective
1.
(grammar) denoting a case of nouns and pronouns in inflected languages that is used esp to identify the subject of a finite verb See also subjective (sense 6)
2.
appointed rather than elected to a position, office, etc
3.
bearing the name of a person
noun
4.
(grammar)

adj.

late 14c., “pertaining to the grammatical case dealing with the subject of a verb,” from Old French nominatif, from Latin nominativus “pertaining to naming,” from nominatus, past participle of nominare (see nominate). As a noun from 1620s.

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Nominative-absolute

    noun, Grammar. 1. a construction consisting in English of a noun, noun phrase, or pronoun in the nominative case followed by a predicate lacking a finite verb, used as a loose modifier of the whole sentence, as the play done in The play done, the audience left the theater.

  • Nominative-address

    noun, Grammar. 1. a noun naming the person to whom one is speaking.



  • Nominative case

    nominative case [(nom-uh-nuh-tiv)] The grammatical term indicating that a noun or pronoun is the subject of a sentence or clause rather than its object. (See case and objective case.)

  • Nominative-of-address

    noun, Grammar. 1. a noun naming the person to whom one is speaking.



Disclaimer: Nominative definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.