Ourselves



[ahr-selvz, ouuh r-, ou-er-] /ɑrˈsɛlvz, aʊər-, ˌaʊ ər-/

plural pronoun
1.
a reflexive form of (used as the direct or indirect object of a verb or the direct object of a preposition):
We are deceiving ourselves. Give us a moment to ourselves.
2.
(used as an intensive with we):
We ourselves would never say such a thing.
3.
Informal. (used in place of or , especially in compound subjects, objects, and complements):
The children and ourselves thank you kindly. When it satisfies ourselves, it will be ready to market. The ones who really want the new system are the manager and ourselves.
4.
(used in place of or after as, than, or but):
How many parents are as fortunate as ourselves? No one loves skiing more than ourselves. Nobody heard it but ourselves.
5.
our customary, normal, or healthy selves:
After a good rest, we’re almost ourselves again.
[mahy-self] /maɪˈsɛlf/
pronoun, plural ourselves
[ahr-selvz, ouuh r-, ou-er-] /ɑrˈsɛlvz, aʊər-, ˌaʊ ər-/ (Show IPA)
1.
(used as an intensive of or ):
I myself will challenge the winner.
2.
(used reflexively in place of as the object of a preposition or as the direct or indirect object of a verb):
I gave myself a good rubdown. She asked me for a picture of myself.
3.
Informal. (used in place of or , especially in compound subjects, objects, and complements):
My wife and myself fully agree. She wanted John and myself to take charge. The originators of the plan were my partner and myself.
4.
(used in place of or after as, than, or but):
He knows as much about the matter as myself.
5.
my normal or customary self:
After a few days of rest, I expect to be myself again.
/aʊəˈsɛlvz/
pronoun
1.

2.
(preceded by a copula) our usual selves: we are ourselves when we’re together
3.
(not standard) used instead of we or us in compound noun phrases: other people and ourselves
/maɪˈsɛlf/
pronoun
1.

2.
(preceded by a copula) my usual self: I’m not myself today
3.
(not standard) used instead of I or me in compound noun phrases: John and myself are voting together
pron.

c.1500, alteration of meself, from Old English phrase (ic) me self, where me is “a kind of ethical dative” [OED], altered in Middle Ages from meself on analogy of herself, with her- felt as genitive; though analogous hisself remains bad form.

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