Out-bounds



[bound] /baʊnd/

noun
1.
Usually, bounds. limit or boundary:
the bounds of space and time; within the bounds of his estate; within the bounds of reason.
2.
something that limits, confines, or restrains.
3.
bounds.

4.
Mathematics. a number greater than or equal to, or less than or equal to, all the numbers in a given set.
Compare , , , .
verb (used with object)
5.
to limit by or as if by bounds; keep within limits or confines.
6.
to form the boundary or limit of.
7.
to name or list the boundary of.
verb (used without object)
8.
to abut.
Idioms
9.
out of bounds,

/baʊnd/
verb
1.
the past tense and past participle of bind
adjective
2.
in bonds or chains; tied with or as if with a rope: a bound prisoner
3.
(in combination) restricted; confined: housebound, fogbound
4.
(postpositive, foll by an infinitive) destined; sure; certain: it’s bound to happen
5.
(postpositive) , often foll by by. compelled or obliged to act, behave, or think in a particular way, as by duty, circumstance, or convention
6.
(of a book) secured within a cover or binding: to deliver bound books See also half-bound
7.
(US) (postpositive) , foll by on. resolved; determined: bound on winning
8.
(linguistics)

9.
(logic) (of a variable) occurring within the scope of a quantifier that indicates the degree of generality of the open sentence in which the variable occurs: in (x) (Fx → bxy), x is bound and y is free See free (sense 22)
10.
bound up with, closely or inextricably linked with: his irritability is bound up with his work
11.
I’ll be bound, I am sure (something) is true
/baʊnd/
verb
1.
to move forwards or make (one’s way) by leaps or jumps
2.
to bounce; spring away from an impact
noun
3.
a jump upwards or forwards
4.
by leaps and bounds, with unexpectedly rapid progess: her condition improved by leaps and bounds
5.
a sudden pronounced sense of excitement: his heart gave a sudden bound when he saw her
6.
a bounce, as of a ball
/baʊnd/
verb
1.
(transitive) to place restrictions on; limit
2.
when intr, foll by on. to form a boundary of (an area of land or sea, political or administrative region, etc)
noun
3.
(maths)

4.
See bounds
/baʊnd/
adjective
1.

adj.

“fastened,” mid-14c., in figurative sense of “compelled,” from bounden, past participle of bind (v.). Meaning “under obligation” is from late 15c.; the literal sense “made fast by tying” is the latest recorded (1550s).

“ready to go,” c.1200, boun, from Old Norse buinn past participle of bua “to prepare,” also “to dwell, to live,” from Proto-Germanic *bowan (cf. Old High German buan “to dwell,” Old Danish both “dwelling, stall”), from PIE root *bheue- “to be, exist, dwell” (see be). Final -d is presumably through association with bound (adj.1).
n.

“limit,” c.1200, from Anglo-Latin bunda, from Old French bonde “limit, boundary, boundary stone” (12c., Modern French borne), variant of bodne, from Medieval Latin bodina, perhaps from Gaulish. Now chiefly in out of bounds, which originally referred to limits imposed on students at schools.
v.

“to form the boundary of,” also “to set the boundaries of,” late 14c., from bound (n.). Related: Bounded; bounding.

“to leap,” 1580s, from French bondir “to rebound, resound, echo,” from Old French bondir “to leap, rebound; make a noise, beat (a drum),” 13c., ultimately “to echo back,” from Vulgar Latin *bombitire “to buzz, hum” (see bomb (n.)), perhaps on model of Old French tentir, from Vulgar Latin *tinnitire.

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