Outrigging



[rig] /rɪg/

verb (used with object), rigged, rigging.
1.
Chiefly Nautical.

2.
to furnish or provide with equipment, clothing, etc.; fit (usually followed by out or up).
3.
to assemble, install, or prepare (often followed by up).
4.
to manipulate fraudulently:
to rig prices.
noun
5.
the arrangement of the masts, spars, sails, etc., on a boat or ship.
6.
apparatus for some purpose; equipment; outfit; gear:
a hi-fi rig; Bring your rod and reel and all the rest of your fishing rig.
7.
Also called drill rig. the equipment used in drilling an oil well.
8.
any combination trucking unit in which vehicles are hooked together, as a tractor-trailer.
9.
any kind of truck.
10.
a carriage, buckboard, sulky, or wagon together with the horse or horses that draw it.
11.
Informal. costume or dress, especially when odd or conspicuous, or when designated for a particular purpose:
He looks quite nifty in a butler’s rig.
Verb phrases
12.
rig down, Nautical. to place in an inactive state, stowing all lines, tackles, and other removable parts.
13.
rig up, to equip or set up for use.
/rɪɡ/
verb (transitive) rigs, rigging, rigged
1.
(nautical) to equip (a vessel, mast, etc) with (sails, rigging, etc)
2.
(nautical) to set up or prepare ready for use
3.
to put the components of (an aircraft, etc) into their correct positions
4.
to manipulate in a fraudulent manner, esp for profit: to rig prices, to rig an election
noun
5.
(nautical) the distinctive arrangement of the sails, masts, and other spars of a vessel
6.
the installation used in drilling for and exploiting natural oil and gas deposits: an oil rig In full drilling rig
7.
apparatus or equipment; gear
8.
an amateur radio operator’s transmitting and receiving set
9.
(US & Canadian) a carriage together with one or more horses
10.
(mainly US & Canadian) an articulated lorry
/rɪɡ/
noun
1.
(Scot & Northern English, dialect) a ridge or raised strip of unploughed land in a ploughed field
v.

late 15c., originally nautical, “to fit with sails,” probably from a Scandinavian source (cf. Danish, Norwegian rigge “to equip,” Swedish rigga “to rig, harness”), though these may be from English; perhaps ultimately from PIE *reig- “to bind.” Slang meaning “to pre-arrange or tamper with results” is attested from 1938, perhaps a different word, from rig (n.) “a trick, swindle, scheme” (1775), earlier “sport, banter, ridicule” (1725), of unknown origin. Also there is rig (v.) “ransack” from 1560s, likewise of unknown origin. Related: Rigged; rigging.
n.

“distinctive arrangement of sails, masts, etc. on a ship,” 1822, from rig (v.). Extended to costume, clothing outfit (1843); horse-drawn vehicle (1831), which led to sense of “truck, bus, etc.” (1851); and apparatus for well-sinking (1875).

noun

verb

To prearrange or tamper with a result or process; fix: Prizefights or horse-races have been rigged (1930s+)
station equipment (shortwave transmission)

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Outrunner

    [out-ruhn-er] /ˈaʊtˌrʌn ər/ noun 1. a person or thing that runs ahead or outside. 2. an attendant who runs before or beside a carriage. 3. the leader of a team of dogs. 4. a forerunner. /ˈaʊtˌrʌnə/ noun 1. an attendant who runs in front of a carriage, etc 2. the leading dog in a sled […]

  • Outs

    [out] /aʊt/ adverb 1. away from, or not in, the normal or usual place, position, state, etc.: out of alphabetical order; to go out to dinner. 2. away from one’s home, country, work, etc., as specified: to go out of town. 3. in or into the outdoors: to go out for a walk. 4. to […]



  • Outrush

    [out-ruhsh] /ˈaʊtˌrʌʃ/ noun 1. a rapid or intense outflow: an outrush of water from a bursting pipe. /ˈaʊtˌrʌʃ/ noun 1. a flowing or rushing out

  • Outsail

    [out-seyl] /ˌaʊtˈseɪl/ verb (used with object) 1. to outdo in ; farther, more skillfully, or faster than.



Disclaimer: Outrigging definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.