Peeps



[peeps] /pips/ Slang.

plural noun, singular peep.
1.
one’s friends, family, followers, etc.:
I’ll have to ask my peeps about this.
2.
people:
Only ten peeps showed up for the hike.
[peep] /pip/
verb (used without object)
1.
to look through a small opening or from a concealed location.
2.
to look slyly, pryingly, or furtively.
3.
to look curiously or playfully.
4.
to come partially into view; begin to appear:
the first crocuses peeping through the snow-covered ground.
verb (used with object)
5.
to show or protrude slightly.
noun
6.
a quick or furtive look or glance.
7.
the first appearance, as of dawn.
8.
an aperture for looking through.
[peep] /pip/
noun
1.
a short, shrill little cry or sound, as of a young bird; cheep; squeak.
2.
any of various small sandpipers.
3.
a slight sound or remark, especially in complaint:
I don’t want to hear a peep out of any of you!
verb (used without object)
4.
to utter the short, shrill little cry of a young bird, a mouse, etc.; cheep; squeak.
5.
to speak in a thin, weak voice.
[peep] /pip/
noun
1.
.
/piːp/
verb (intransitive)
1.
to look furtively or secretly, as through a small aperture or from a hidden place
2.
to appear partially or briefly: the sun peeped through the clouds
noun
3.
a quick or furtive look
4.
the first appearance: the peep of dawn
/piːp/
verb (intransitive)
1.
(esp of young birds) to utter shrill small noises
2.
to speak in a thin shrill voice
noun
3.
a peeping sound
4.
(US) any of various small sandpipers of the genus Calidris (or Erolia) and related genera, such as the pectoral sandpiper
v.

“glance” (especially through a small opening), mid-15c., perhaps alteration of Middle English piken (see peek (v.)). Peeping Tom “a curious prying fellow” [Grose] is from 1796; connection with Lady Godiva story dates only from 1837.

“make a short chirp,” c.1400, probably altered from pipen (mid-13c.), ultimately imitative (cf. Latin pipare, French pepier, German piepen, Lithuanian pypti, Czech pipati, Greek pipos).
n.

1520s, first in sense found in peep of day, from peep (v.1); meaning “a furtive glance” is first recorded 1730.

“short chirp,” early 15c., from peep (v.2); meaning “slightest sound or utterance” (usually in a negative context) is attested from 1903. Meaning “young chicken” is from 1680s. The marshmallow peeps confection are said to date from 1950s.

PEEP abbr.
positive end-expiratory pressure

noun

positive end-expiratory pressure
see: hear a peep out of

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