Pizi-gall



[gawl] /gɔl/

noun
1.
(Pizi) 1840?–94, leader of the Hunkpapa Sioux: a major chief in the battle of Little Bighorn.
/ɡɔːl/
noun
1.
(informal) impudence
2.
bitterness; rancour
3.
something bitter or disagreeable
4.
(physiol) an obsolete term for bile1
5.
an obsolete term for gall bladder
/ɡɔːl/
noun
1.
a sore on the skin caused by chafing
2.
something that causes vexation or annoyance: a gall to the spirits
3.
irritation; exasperation
verb
4.
(pathol) to abrade (the skin, etc) as by rubbing
5.
(transitive) to irritate or annoy; vex
/ɡɔːl/
noun
1.
an abnormal outgrowth in plant tissue caused by certain parasitic insects, fungi, bacteria, or mechanical injury
n.

“bile,” Old English galla (Anglian), gealla (W. Saxon) “gall, bile,” from Proto-Germanic *gallon- (cf. Old Norse gall, Old Saxon, Old High German galla, German Galle), from PIE root *ghel- “gold, yellow, yellowish-green” (see Chloe). Informal sense of “impudence, boldness” first recorded American English 1882; but meaning “embittered spirit, rancor” is from c.1200, from the medieval theory of humors. Gall bladder recorded from 1670s.

“sore spot on a horse,” Old English gealla “painful swelling,” from Latin galla “gall, lump on plant,” originally “oak apple,” of uncertain origin. Perhaps from or influenced by gall (1) on notion of “poison-sore.” German galle, Dutch gal also are from Latin.
v.

“to make sore by chafing,” mid-15c., from gall (n.2). Earlier “to have sores, be sore” (early 14c.). Figurative sense of “harass, irritate” is from 1570s. Related: Galled; galling.

gall 1 (gôl)
n.
See bile.

gall 2 (gôl)
n.
A skin sore caused by friction and abrasion. v. galled, gall·ing, galls
To become irritated, chafed, or sore.
gall
(gôl)
An abnormal swelling of plant tissue, caused by injury or by parasitic organisms such as insects, mites, nematodes, and bacteria. Parasites stimulate the production of galls by secreting chemical irritants on or in the plant tissue. Galls stimulated by egg-laying parasites typically provide a protective environment in which the eggs can hatch and the pupae develop, and they usually do only minor damage to the host plant. Gall-stimulating fungi and microorganisms, such as the bacterium that causes crown gall, are generally considered to be plant diseases.

(1) Heb. mererah, meaning “bitterness” (Job 16:13); i.e., the bile secreted in the liver. This word is also used of the poison of asps (20:14), and of the vitals, the seat of life (25). (2.) Heb. rosh. In Deut. 32:33 and Job 20:16 it denotes the poison of serpents. In Hos. 10:4 the Hebrew word is rendered “hemlock.” The original probably denotes some bitter, poisonous plant, most probably the poppy, which grows up quickly, and is therefore coupled with wormwood (Deut. 29:18; Jer. 9:15; Lam. 3:19). Comp. Jer. 8:14; 23:15, “water of gall,” Gesenius, “poppy juice;” others, “water of hemlock,” “bitter water.” (3.) Gr. chole (Matt. 27:34), the LXX. translation of the Hebrew _rosh_ in Ps. 69; 21, which foretells our Lord’s sufferings. The drink offered to our Lord was vinegar (made of light wine rendered acid, the common drink of Roman soldiers) “mingled with gall,” or, according to Mark (15:23), “mingled with myrrh;” both expressions meaning the same thing, namely, that the vinegar was made bitter by the infusion of wormwood or some other bitter substance, usually given, according to a merciful custom, as an anodyne to those who were crucified, to render them insensible to pain. Our Lord, knowing this, refuses to drink it. He would take nothing to cloud his faculties or blunt the pain of dying. He chooses to suffer every element of woe in the bitter cup of agony given him by the Father (John 18:11).

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