Pluming



[ploom] /plum/

noun
1.
a feather.
2.
a large, long, or conspicuous feather:
the brilliant plume of a peacock.
3.
a soft, fluffy feather:
the plume of an egret.
4.
any plumose part or formation.
5.
a feather, a tuft of feathers, or some substitute, worn as an ornament, as on a hat, helmet, etc.
6.
a feather or featherlike token of honor or distinction, especially one worn on a helmet.
7.
.
8.
a vertically or longitudinally moving, rising, or expanding fluid body, as of smoke or water.
9.
a visible pattern of smoke resulting from emissions from a stack, flue, or chimney.
10.
Also called mantle plume. Geology. a deep-seated upwelling of magma within the earth’s mantle.
Compare .
verb (used with object), plumed, pluming.
11.
to furnish, cover, or adorn with plumes or feathers.
12.
(of a bird) to preen (itself or its feathers).
13.
to feel complacent satisfaction with (oneself); pride (oneself) (often followed by on or upon):
She sat before the mirror, pluming herself upon her beauty.
/pluːm/
noun
1.
a feather, esp one that is large or ornamental
2.
a feather or cluster of feathers worn esp formerly as a badge or ornament in a headband, hat, etc
3.
(biology) any feathery part, such as the structure on certain fruits and seeds that aids dispersal by wind
4.
something that resembles a plume: a plume of smoke
5.
a token or decoration of honour; prize
6.
(geology) a rising column of hot, low viscosity material within the earth’s mantle, which is believed to be responsible for linear oceanic island chains and flood basalts Also called mantle plume
verb (transitive)
7.
to adorn or decorate with feathers or plumes
8.
(of a bird) to clean or preen (itself or its feathers)
9.
foll by on or upon. to pride or congratulate (oneself)
n.

late 14c., “a feather” (especially a large and conspicuous one), from Old French plume “soft feather, down; feather bed,” and directly from Latin pluma “a feather, down; the first beard,” from PIE root *pleus- “to pluck; a feather, fleece” (cf. Old English fleos “fleece”). Meaning “a long streamer of smoke, etc.” is first attested 1878.
v.

late 14c., “to pluck, strip,” from plume (n.). From mid-15c. as “to adorn with plumes.” Meaning “to dress the feathers” is from 1702. Related: Plumed; pluming.
plume
(plm)

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Plume oneself

    Congratulate oneself, boast, as in He plumed himself on his victory. This idiom transfers the bird’s habit of dressing its feathers to human self-satisfaction. [ First half of 1600s ]

  • Plummer

    [pluhm] /plʌm/ noun 1. the drupaceous fruit of any of several trees belonging to the genus Prunus, of the rose family, having an oblong stone. 2. the tree itself. 3. any of various other trees bearing a plumlike fruit. 4. the fruit itself. 5. a . 6. a raisin, as in a cake or pudding. […]



  • Plummer block

    /ˈplʌmə/ noun 1. another name for pillow block

  • Plummer-vinson syndrome

    Plummer-Vinson syndrome Plum·mer-Vin·son syndrome (plŭm’ər-vĭn’sən) n. Difficulty in swallowing caused by degeneration of the muscle of the esophagus, atrophy of the papillae of the tongue, and hypochromic anemia.



Disclaimer: Pluming definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.