Pye



[pahy] /paɪ/

noun, Ecclesiastical.
1.
4 .
[pahy] /paɪ/
noun
1.
(in England before the Reformation) a book of ecclesiastical rules for finding the particulars of the service for the day.
/paɪ/
noun
1.
a variant spelling of pie5
/paɪ/
noun
1.
a baked food consisting of a sweet or savoury filling in a pastry-lined dish, often covered with a pastry crust
2.
have a finger in the pie

3.
pie in the sky, illusory hope or promise of some future good; false optimism
/paɪ/
noun
1.
an archaic or dialect name for magpie
/paɪ/
noun, verb
1.
(printing) a variant spelling of pi2
/paɪ/
noun
1.
a very small former Indian coin worth one third of a pice
/paɪ/
noun
1.
(history) a book for finding the Church service for any particular day
/paɪ/
adjective
1.
(NZ, informal) be pie on, to be keen on
n.

“pastry,” mid-14c. (probably older; piehus “bakery” is attested from late 12c.), from Medieval Latin pie “meat or fish enclosed in pastry” (c.1300), perhaps related to Medieval Latin pia “pie, pastry,” also possibly connected with pica “magpie” (see pie (n.2)) on notion of the bird’s habit of collecting miscellaneous objects. Figurative of “something to be shared out” by 1967.

According to OED, not known outside English, except Gaelic pighe, which is from English. In the Middle Ages, a pie had many ingredients, a pastry but one. Fruit pies began to appear c.1600. Figurative sense of “something easy” is from 1889. Pie-eyed “drunk” is from 1904. Phrase pie in the sky is 1911, from Joe Hill’s Wobbly parody of hymns. Pieman is not attested earlier than the nursery rhyme “Simple Simon” (c.1820). Pie chart is from 1922.

“magpie,” mid-13c. (late 12c. as a surname), from Old French pie (13c.), from Latin pica “magpie” (see magpie). In 16c., a wily pie was a “cunning person.”

also pi, printers’ slang for “a mass of type jumbled together” (also pi, pye), 1650s, perhaps from pie (n.1) on notion of a “medley,” or pie (n.2); cf. pica (n.1). As a verb from 1870. Related: Pied.

noun

An easy task or job; gravy: That’s pie for him (1889+)

Related Terms

apple-pie order, cutesy-poo, cutie-pie, easy as pie, fur pie, hair pie, sweetie-pie
Proto-Indo-European
In addition to the idiom beginning with
pie

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  • Pye-dog

    [pahy-dawg, -dog] /ˈpaɪˌdɔg, -ˌdɒg/ noun 1. an ownerless half-wild dog of uncertain breeding, common in the villages and towns of India and other countries in east and south Asia. noun 1. an ownerless half-wild Asian dog

  • Pyelectasis

    pyelectasis py·e·lec·ta·sis (pī’ə-lěk’tə-sĭs) or py·e·lec·ta·si·a (pī’ə-lĭk-tā’zē-ə, -zhə) n. Dilation of the pelvis of the kidney.



  • Pyelitis

    [pahy-uh-lahy-tis] /ˌpaɪ əˈlaɪ tɪs/ noun, Pathology. 1. inflammation of the pelvis or outlet of the kidney. /ˌpaɪəˈlaɪtɪs/ noun 1. inflammation of the pelvis of the kidney Compare pyelonephritis pyelitis py·e·li·tis (pī’ə-lī’tĭs) n. Acute inflammation of the pelvis of the kidney, caused by bacterial infection. py’e·lit’ic (-lĭt’ĭk) adj.

  • Pyelocystitis

    pyelocystitis py·e·lo·cys·ti·tis (pī’ə-lō-sĭ-stī’tĭs) n. Inflammation of the renal pelvis and the urinary bladder.



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