[kee, key, kwey] /ki, keɪ, kweɪ/

a landing place, especially one of solid masonry, constructed along the edge of a body of water; wharf.
[kwey] /kweɪ/
Matthew Stanley, 1833–1904, U.S. politician: senator 1887–99, 1901–4.
a wharf, typically one built parallel to the shoreline Compare pier (sense 1)

1690s, variant of Middle English key, keye, caye “wharf” (c.1300; mid-13c. in place names), from Old North French cai (Old French chai, 12c., Modern French quai) “sand bank,” from Gaulish caium (5c.), from Old Celtic *kagio- “to encompass, enclose” (cf. Welsh cae “fence, hedge,” Cornish ke “hedge”), from PIE *kagh- “to catch, seize; wickerwork, fence” (see hedge (n.)). Spelling altered in English by influence of French quai.


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