Quoter



[kwoht] /kwoʊt/

verb (used with object), quoted, quoting.
1.
to repeat (a passage, phrase, etc.) from a book, speech, or the like, as by way of authority, illustration, etc.
2.
to repeat words from (a book, author, etc.).
3.
to use a brief excerpt from:
The composer quotes Beethoven’s Fifth in his latest work.
4.
to cite, offer, or bring forward as evidence or support.
5.
to enclose (words) within quotation marks.
6.
Commerce.

verb (used without object), quoted, quoting.
7.
to make a or , as from a book or author.
8.
(used by a speaker to indicate the beginning of a . )
noun
9.
a .
10.
.
Idioms
11.
quote unquote, so called; so to speak; as it were:
If you’re a liberal, quote unquote, they’re suspicious of you.
/kwəʊt/
verb
1.
to recite a quotation (from a book, play, poem, etc), esp as a means of illustrating or supporting a statement
2.
(transitive) to put quotation marks round (a word, phrase, etc)
3.
(stock exchange) to state (a current market price) of (a security or commodity)
noun
4.
an informal word for quotation (sense 1), quotation (sense 2), quotation (sense 3), quotation (sense 4)
5.
(often pl) an informal word for quotation mark put it in quotes
interjection
6.
an expression used parenthetically to indicate that the words that follow it form a quotation: the president said, quote, I shall not run for office in November, unquote
v.

late 14c., coten, “to mark (a book) with chapter numbers or marginal references,” from Old French coter, from Medieval Latin quotare “distinguish by numbers, number chapters,” from Latin quotus “which in order? what number (in sequence)?,” from quot “how many,” from PIE *kwo-ti-, from pronomial root *kwo- (see who).

The sense development is via “to give as a reference, to cite as an authority” (1570s) to “to copy out or repeat exact words” (1670s). Modern spelling with qu- is from early 15c. The business sense of “to state the price of a commodity” (1866) revives the etymological meaning. Related: Quoted; quoting.
n.

“a quotation,” 1885, from quote (v.). From c.1600 as “a marginal reference.” Quotes for “quotation marks” is from 1869.

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  • Quoteworthy

    [kwoht-wur-th ee] /ˈkwoʊtˌwɜr ði/ adjective 1. .

  • Quote-unquote

    [kwoht] /kwoʊt/ verb (used with object), quoted, quoting. 1. to repeat (a passage, phrase, etc.) from a book, speech, or the like, as by way of authority, illustration, etc. 2. to repeat words from (a book, author, etc.). 3. to use a brief excerpt from: The composer quotes Beethoven’s Fifth in his latest work. 4. […]



  • Quoth

    [kwohth] /kwoʊθ/ verb, Archaic. 1. said (used with nouns, and with first- and third-person pronouns, and always placed before the subject): Quoth the raven, “Nevermore.”. /kwəʊθ/ verb 1. (archaic) used with all pronouns except thou and you, and with nouns another word for said1 (sense 2) v. Old English cwæð, third person singular past tense […]

  • Quotha

    [kwoh-thuh] /ˈkwoʊ θə/ interjection, Archaic. 1. indeed! (used ironically or contemptuously in quoting another). /ˈkwəʊθə/ interjection 1. (archaic) an expression of mild sarcasm, used in picking up a word or phrase used by someone else: Art thou mad? Mad, quotha! I am more sane than thou



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