Ragingly



[reyj] /reɪdʒ/

noun
1.
angry fury; violent anger (sometimes used in combination): a speech full of rage;
incidents of road rage.
2.
a fit of violent anger:
Her rages usually don’t last too long.
3.
fury or violence of wind, waves, fire, disease, etc.
4.
violence of feeling, desire, or appetite:
the rage of thirst.
5.
a violent desire or passion.
6.
ardor; fervor; enthusiasm:
poetic rage.
7.
the object of widespread enthusiasm, as for being popular or fashionable:
Raccoon coats were the rage on campus.
8.
Archaic. .
verb (used without object), raged, raging.
9.
to act or speak with fury; show or feel violent anger; fulminate.
10.
to move, rush, dash, or surge furiously.
11.
to proceed, continue, or prevail with great violence:
The battle raged ten days.
12.
(of feelings, opinions, etc.) to hold sway with unabated violence.
Idioms
13.
all the rage, widely popular or in style.
/reɪdʒ/
noun
1.
intense anger; fury
2.
violent movement or action, esp of the sea, wind, etc
3.
great intensity of hunger, sexual desire, or other feelings
4.
aggressive behaviour associated with a specified environment or activity: road rage, school rage
5.
a fashion or craze (esp in the phrase all the rage)
6.
(Austral & NZ, informal) a dance or party
verb (intransitive)
7.
to feel or exhibit intense anger
8.
(esp of storms, fires, etc) to move or surge with great violence
9.
(esp of a disease or epidemic) to spread rapidly and uncontrollably
10.
(Austral & NZ, informal) to have a good time
n.

c.1300, “madness, insanity; fit of frenzy; anger, wrath; fierceness in battle; violence of storm, fire, etc.,” from Old French rage, raige “spirit, passion, rage, fury, madness” (11c.), from Medieval Latin rabia, from Latin rabies “madness, rage, fury,” related to rabere “be mad, rave” (cf. rabies, which originally had this sense), from PIE *rebh- “violent, impetuous” (cf. Old English rabbian “to rage”). Similarly, Welsh (cynddaredd) and Breton (kounnar) words for “rage, fury” originally meant “hydrophobia” and are compounds based on the word for “dog” (Welsh ci, plural cwn; Breton ki). In 15c.-16c. it also could mean “rabies.” The rage “fashion, vogue” dates from 1785.
v.

mid-13c., “to play, romp,” from rage (n.). Meanings “be furious; speak passionately; go mad” first recorded c.1300. Of things from 1530s. Related: Raged; raging.

noun

A good party: This is a rage, man (Australian 1980+, Canadian 1990s+)
see: all the rage

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