Ransomer



[ran-suh m] /ˈræn səm/

noun
1.
the redemption of a prisoner, slave, or kidnapped person, of captured goods, etc., for a price.
2.
the sum or price paid or demanded.
3.
a means of deliverance or rescue from punishment for sin, especially the payment of a redemptive fine.
verb (used with object)
4.
to redeem from captivity, bondage, detention, etc., by paying a demanded price.
5.
to release or restore on receipt of a ransom.
6.
to deliver or redeem from punishment for sin.
/ˈrænsəm/
noun
1.
the release of captured prisoners, property, etc, on payment of a stipulated price
2.
the price demanded or stipulated for such a release
3.
rescue or redemption of any kind
4.
hold to ransom

5.
a king’s ransom, a very large amount of money or valuables
verb (transitive)
6.
to pay a stipulated price and so obtain the release of (prisoners, property, etc)
7.
to set free (prisoners, property, etc) upon receiving the payment demanded
8.
to redeem; rescue: Christ ransomed men from sin
/ˈrænsəm/
noun
1.
John Crowe. 1888–1974, US poet and critic
n.

c.1200, “sum paid for the release of a prisoner or captured man,” from Old French ranson (Modern French rançon), earlier raenson “ransom, redemption,” from Latin redemptionem (nominative redemptio) “a redeeming,” from redimere (see redeem).

early 14c., from ransom (n.). Related: Ransomed; ransoming.

the price or payment made for our redemption, as when it is said that the Son of man “gave his life a ransom for many” (Matt. 20:28; comp. Acts 20:28; Rom. 3:23, 24; 1 Cor. 6:19, 20; Gal. 3:13; 4:4, 5: Eph. 1:7; Col. 1:14; 1 Tim. 2:6; Titus 2:14; 1 Pet. 1:18, 19. In all these passages the same idea is expressed). This word is derived from the Fr. rancon; Lat. redemptio. The debt is represented not as cancelled but as fully paid. The slave or captive is not liberated by a mere gratuitous favour, but a ransom price has been paid, in consideration of which he is set free. The original owner receives back his alienated and lost possession because he has bought it back “with a price.” This price or ransom (Gr. lutron) is always said to be Christ, his blood, his death. He secures our redemption by the payment of a ransom. (See REDEMPTION.)

see: king’s ransom

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