Rearer



[reer] /rɪər/

noun
1.
the back of something, as distinguished from the front:
The porch is at the rear of the house.
2.
the space or position behind something:
The bus driver asked the passengers to move to the rear.
3.
the buttocks; rump.
4.
the hindmost portion of an army, fleet, etc.
adjective
5.
pertaining to or situated at the rear of something:
the rear door of a bus.
Idioms
6.
bring up the rear, to be at the end; follow behind:
The army retreated, and the fleeing civilian population brought up the rear.
/rɪə/
noun
1.
the back or hind part
2.
the area or position that lies at the back: a garden at the rear of the house
3.
the section of a military force or procession farthest from the front
4.
the buttocks See buttock
5.
bring up the rear, to be at the back in a procession, race, etc
6.
in the rear, at the back
7.
(modifier) of or in the rear: the rear legs, the rear side
/rɪə/
verb
1.
(transitive) to care for and educate (children) until maturity; bring up; raise
2.
(transitive) to breed (animals) or grow (plants)
3.
(transitive) to place or lift (a ladder, etc) upright
4.
(transitive) to erect (a monument, building, etc); put up
5.
(intransitive) often foll by up. (esp of horses) to lift the front legs in the air and stand nearly upright
6.
(intransitive; often foll by up or over) (esp of tall buildings) to rise high; tower
7.
(intransitive) to start with anger, resentment, etc
n.

“hindmost part,” c.1600, abstracted from rerewarde “rear guard, hindmost part of an army or fleet” (mid-14c.), from Anglo-French rerewarde, Old French rieregarde, from Old French adverb riere “behind” (from Latin retro “back, behind;” see retro-) + Old French garde (see guard (n.)). Or the word may be a shortened form of arrear (see arrears).

As a euphemism for “buttocks” it is attested from 1796. Rear admiral is first attested 1580s, apparently so called from ranking “behind” an admiral proper. Rear-view (mirror) is recorded from 1926.
v.

Old English ræran “to raise, build up, create, set on end; arouse, excite, stir up,” from Proto-Germanic *raizijanau “to raise,” causative of *risanan “to rise” (see raise (v.)). Meaning “bring into being, bring up” (as a child) is recorded from early 15c.; that of “raise up on the hind legs” is first recorded late 14c. Related: Reared; rearing.

“attack in the rear,” 17c., from rear (n.).
adj.

c.1300, from Old French rere (see rear (n.)).

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Rearguard

    [reer-gahrd] /ˈrɪərˌgɑrd/ adjective 1. of or relating to a rear guard. 2. designed to oppose or prevent in a defensive way: a rearguard strategy. /ˈrɪəˌɡɑːd/ noun 1. a detachment detailed to protect the rear of a military formation, esp in retreat 2. an entrenched or conservative element, as in a political party 3. rearguard action

  • Rear-guard

    noun 1. a part of an army or military force detached from the main body to bring up and guard the rear from surprise attack, especially in a retreat. [reer-gahrd] /ˈrɪərˌgɑrd/ adjective 1. of or relating to a rear guard. 2. designed to oppose or prevent in a defensive way: a rearguard strategy. /ˈrɪəˌɡɑːd/ noun […]



  • Rearing

    [reer] /rɪər/ verb (used with object) 1. to take care of and support up to maturity: to rear a child. 2. to breed and raise (livestock). 3. to raise by building; erect. 4. to raise to an upright position: to rear a ladder. 5. to lift or hold up; elevate; raise. verb (used without object) […]

  • Rearise

    [uh-rahyz] /əˈraɪz/ verb (used without object), arose, arisen [uh-riz-uh n] /əˈrɪz ən/ (Show IPA), arising. 1. to get up from sitting, lying, or kneeling; rise: He arose from his chair when she entered the room. 2. to awaken; wake up: He arose at sunrise to get an early start to the beach. 3. to move […]



Disclaimer: Rearer definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.