an act of redeeming or atoning for a fault or mistake, or the state of being redeemed.
deliverance; rescue.
Theology. deliverance from sin; salvation.
atonement for guilt.
repurchase, as of something sold.
paying off, as of a mortgage, bond, or note.
recovery by payment, as of something pledged.
conversion of paper money into specie.
the act or process of redeeming
the state of being redeemed

deliverance from sin through the incarnation, sufferings, and death of Christ
atonement for guilt

conversion of paper money into bullion or specie

removal of a financial obligation by paying off a note, bond, etc
(as modifier): redemption date

the purchase back of something that had been lost, by the payment of a ransom. The Greek word so rendered is _apolutrosis_, a word occurring nine times in Scripture, and always with the idea of a ransom or price paid, i.e., redemption by a lutron (see Matt. 20:28; Mark 10:45). There are instances in the LXX. Version of the Old Testament of the use of _lutron_ in man’s relation to man (Lev. 19:20; 25:51; Ex. 21:30; Num. 35:31, 32; Isa. 45:13; Prov. 6:35), and in the same sense of man’s relation to God (Num. 3:49; 18:15). There are many passages in the New Testament which represent Christ’s sufferings under the idea of a ransom or price, and the result thereby secured is a purchase or redemption (comp. Acts 20:28; 1 Cor. 6:19, 20; Gal. 3:13; 4:4, 5; Eph. 1:7; Col. 1:14; 1 Tim. 2:5, 6; Titus 2:14; Heb. 9:12; 1 Pet. 1:18, 19; Rev. 5:9). The idea running through all these texts, however various their reference, is that of payment made for our redemption. The debt against us is not viewed as simply cancelled, but is fully paid. Christ’s blood or life, which he surrendered for them, is the “ransom” by which the deliverance of his people from the servitude of sin and from its penal consequences is secured. It is the plain doctrine of Scripture that “Christ saves us neither by the mere exercise of power, nor by his doctrine, nor by his example, nor by the moral influence which he exerted, nor by any subjective influence on his people, whether natural or mystical, but as a satisfaction to divine justice, as an expiation for sin, and as a ransom from the curse and authority of the law, thus reconciling us to God by making it consistent with his perfection to exercise mercy toward sinners” (Hodge’s Systematic Theology).


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    [ri-demp-shuh-ner] /rɪˈdɛmp ʃə nər/ noun, American History. 1. an emigrant from Europe to America who obtained passage by becoming an indentured servant for a specified period of time. redemptioner /rɪˈdɛmpʃənə/ noun 1. (history) an emigrant to Colonial America who paid for his passage by becoming an indentured servant

  • Redemption yield

    noun 1. (stock exchange) the yield produced by a redeemable gilt-edged security taking into account the annual interest it pays and an annualized amount to account for any profit or loss when it is redeemed noun an estimate of the total long term returns, including income and capital, on fixed income investments like corporate bonds […]

  • Redemptive

    adjective 1. serving to redeem. 2. of, relating to, or centering on redemption or salvation: redemptive religions.

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