Rodney porter

Cole, 1893–1964, U.S. composer.
David, 1780–1843, U.S. naval officer.
his son, David Dixon
[dik-suh n] /ˈdɪk sən/ (Show IPA), 1813–91, Union naval officer in the Civil War.
Edwin Stanton, 1870–1941, U.S. film director.
Gene (Gene Stratton Porter) 1868–1924, U.S. novelist.
Sir George, 1920–2002, British chemist: Nobel prize 1967.
Katherine Anne, 1890–1980, U.S. writer.
Noah, 1811–92, U.S. educator, writer, and lexicographer.
Rodney Robert, 1917–85, British biochemist: Nobel Prize in medicine 1972.
William Sydney (“O. Henry”) 1862–1910, U.S. short-story writer.
a male given name.
a person employed to carry luggage, parcels, supplies, etc, esp at a railway station or hotel
(in hospitals) a person employed to move patients from place to place
(US & Canadian) a railway employee who waits on passengers, esp in a sleeper
(E African) a manual labourer
(mainly Brit) a person in charge of a gate or door; doorman or gatekeeper
a person employed by a university or college as a caretaker and doorkeeper who also answers enquiries
a person in charge of the maintenance of a building, esp a block of flats
(RC Church) Also called ostiary. a person ordained to what was formerly the lowest in rank of the minor orders
(Brit) a dark sweet ale brewed from black malt
Cole. 1893–1964, US composer and lyricist of musical comedies. His most popular songs include Night and Day and Let’s do It
George, Baron Porter of Luddenham. 1920–2002, British chemist, who shared a Nobel prize for chemistry in 1967 for his work on flash photolysis
Katherine Anne. 1890–1980, US short-story writer and novelist. Her best-known collections of stories are Flowering Judas (1930) and Pale Horse, Pale Rider (1939)
Rodney Robert. 1917–85, British biochemist: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine 1972 for determining the structure of an antibody
William Sidney. original name of O. Henry
British biochemist who shared with George Edelman the 1972 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine for their study of the chemical structure of antibodies.


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