Take issue with

Disagree with, as in I take issue with those figures; they don’t include last month’s sales. This idiom comes from legal terminology, where it was originally put as to join issue, meaning “take the opposite side of a case.” [ Late 1600s ]


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  • Take it easy

    take someone into camp take it easy Don’t hurry, proceed at a comfortable pace, relax. For example, Take it easy—we don’t have to be there till noon, or Bruce decided to take it easy this weekend and put off working on the house. [ Mid-1800s ]

  • Take it from here

    Also, take it from there. Continue from a certain point onwards, as in I’ve done what I could with correcting the blatant errors; you’ll have to take it from here. [ Mid-1900s ]

  • Take it from me

    Also, you can take it from me. Rest assured, believe me, as in You can take it from me, we’ve been working hard on it. This idiom was first recorded in 1622 in slightly different form, take it upon my word. The current form appeared in 1672.

  • Take it in the ear

    put it in your ear take it easy

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