Take it out of one

Exhaust or fatigue one, as in This construction job really takes it out of me. This idiom alludes to depleting one’s energy. [ Mid-1800s ]


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  • Take its toll

    Be damaging or harmful, cause loss or destruction, as in The civil war has taken its toll on both sides, or The heavy truck traffic has taken its toll on the highways. This expression transfers the taking of toll, a tribute or tax, to exacting other costs. [ Late 1800s ]

  • Take it to the street

    take it out of someone’s hide

  • Take it upon oneself

    Also, take on oneself. Undertake something, as in I took it upon myself to count the precise number of children in the audience, or She took it on herself to enter a convent. [ Second half of 1400s ]

  • Take kindly to

    Be receptive to, attracted by, or pleased with, as in He’ll take kindly to the criticism if it’s constructive, or Henry won’t take kindly to your stepping on his newly planted grass. This idiom uses kindly in the sense of “in a pleasant or agreeable manner.” [ c. 1800 ]

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