Take it upon oneself



Also, take on oneself. Undertake something, as in I took it upon myself to count the precise number of children in the audience, or She took it on herself to enter a convent. [ Second half of 1400s ]

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  • Take kindly to

    Be receptive to, attracted by, or pleased with, as in He’ll take kindly to the criticism if it’s constructive, or Henry won’t take kindly to your stepping on his newly planted grass. This idiom uses kindly in the sense of “in a pleasant or agreeable manner.” [ c. 1800 ]

  • Take leave of

    1. Also, take one’s leave of. Depart from, say good-bye to. For example, Sorry but I have to take leave of you now, or After the movie we’ll take our leave of you. [ Mid-1200s ] 2. take leave of one’s senses. Behave irrationally, act crazy, as in Give them the keys to the house? […]



  • Take liberties

    1. Behave improperly or disrespectfully; also, make unwanted sexual advances. For example, He doesn’t allow staff members to take liberties, such as calling clients by their first names, or She decided that if Jack tried to take liberties with her she would go straight home. This idiom uses liberties in the sense of “an overstepping […]

  • Takelma

    noun 1. a member of a North American Indian people of southwestern Oregon, extinct since the early 20th century. 2. the Penutian language of the Takelma.



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