Take pity on



Also, have pity on. Show compassion or mercy to, as in Take pity on the cook and eat that last piece of cake, or, as Miles Coverdale’s 1535 translation of the Bible has it (Job 19:21), “Have pity upon me, have pity upon me, O ye, my friends.” This idiom may be used half-jokingly, as in the first example, or seriously. [ Late 1200s ]

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    Come to eat whatever happens to be served; also, take one’s chances. For example, You’re welcome to join us for supper but you’ll have to take potluck, or When the flight was canceled, passengers had to take potluck on other airlines. This idiom alludes to accepting whatever happens to be in the cooking pot. [ […]

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    see: pride oneself on

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    verb (used with object), took, taken, taking. 1. to get into one’s hold or possession by voluntary action: to take a cigarette out of a box; to take a pen and begin to write. 2. to hold, grasp, or grip: to take a book in one’s hand; to take a child by the hand. 3. […]



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