Acquisitive



tending or seeking to and own, often greedily; eager to get wealth, possessions, etc.:
our acquisitive impulses; acquisitive societies.
Contemporary Examples

Comcast, acquisitive octopus that it is, has a new, $45 billion bid for Time Warner Cable currently on the table.
Can Jimmy Fallon Be Himself on ‘The Tonight Show’? Tom Shales February 16, 2014

“I think at that level the acquisitive hunter-gatherer gene influences them more than riches,” Bass said.
Faulkner of Oil Country: Rick Bass Talks New Novel Jane Ciabattari August 21, 2013

Susan Sontag once described the camera as “the ideal arm of consciousness in an acquisitive mood.”
David Lynch’s American Dreams Lee Siegel July 19, 2009

Along with his relatives and cronies, Karzai is widely suspected of corruption of both the acquisitive and political variety.
Karzai Loses His Only Friend Lloyd Grove June 21, 2010

Historical Examples

It is of the essence of the scheme that the acquisitive activities of mankind afford a net balance of pleasure.
The Place of Science in Modern Civilisation and Other Essays Thorstein Veblen

The mind of the modern Japanese is progressive and acquisitive.
The Empire of the East H. B. Montgomery

He was of an acquisitive nature, was Charlie—and the road to his favor must be paved with gifts.
Good Indian B. M. Bower

The acquisitive Spaniard soon “caught on” and has never yet let go.
On the Mexican Highlands William Seymour Edwards

This growth and development which I speak of is not intellectual in the acquisitive sense.
The Hive Will Levington Comfort

The acquisitive instincts of man were exaggerated at the expense of the creative.
Reconstruction in Philosophy John Dewey

adjective
inclined or eager to acquire things, esp material possessions: we currently live in an acquisitive society
adj.

1630s, “owned through acquisition,” from Latin acquisit-, past participle stem of acquirere (see acquisition) + -ive. Meaning “given to acquisition, avaricious” is from 1826 (implied in acquisitiveness). Related: Acquisitively (1590s).

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  • Acquisitory

    tending or seeking to and own, often greedily; eager to get wealth, possessions, etc.: our acquisitive impulses; acquisitive societies. adjective inclined or eager to acquire things, esp material possessions: we currently live in an acquisitive society adj. 1630s, “owned through acquisition,” from Latin acquisit-, past participle stem of acquirere (see acquisition) + -ive. Meaning “given […]

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