Acquisitiveness



tending or seeking to and own, often greedily; eager to get wealth, possessions, etc.:
our acquisitive impulses; acquisitive societies.
Historical Examples

Amativeness and acquisitiveness are only different channels of one stream.
History of American Socialisms John Humphrey Noyes

The man of Fiction and the man of Fact were at one in this passion of acquisitiveness.
The Book-Hunter in London William Roberts

Russell was not noted for anything but his acquisitiveness but he was a faithful servant of the Crown in his own way.
The Journal of Negro History, Volume 4, 1919 Various

His organ of caution was large, but that of acquisitiveness moderate.
What Will He Do With It, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

Gradually, one after another, the other four girls fell under the lure of their vanity and their acquisitiveness.
Angel Island Inez Haynes Gillmore

A few have almost no other vice save that of acquisitiveness.
Chambers’s Journal of Popular Literature, Science, and Art Various

acquisitiveness also large; this gentleman believes in getting the full value for his money.
Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 93, September 24, 1887 Various

It is directly below Ideality and in front of acquisitiveness.
How to Read Human Nature William Walker Atkinson

acquisitiveness includes the tact of pickpockets and the ardour of merchants.
Bouvard and Pcuchet, part 2 Gustave Flaubert

acquisitiveness—money and land—had become his one, his ruling passion.
The Torrent Vicente Blasco Ibaez

adjective
inclined or eager to acquire things, esp material possessions: we currently live in an acquisitive society
adj.

1630s, “owned through acquisition,” from Latin acquisit-, past participle stem of acquirere (see acquisition) + -ive. Meaning “given to acquisition, avaricious” is from 1826 (implied in acquisitiveness). Related: Acquisitively (1590s).

Tagged:

Read Also:

  • Acquisitor

    the act of or gaining possession: the acquisition of real estate. something ; addition: public excitement about the museum’s recent acquisitions. the purchase of one business enterprise by another: the acquisition of a rival corporation; mergers and acquisitions. Linguistics. the act or process of achieving mastery of a language or a linguistic rule or element: […]

  • Acquisitory

    tending or seeking to and own, often greedily; eager to get wealth, possessions, etc.: our acquisitive impulses; acquisitive societies. adjective inclined or eager to acquire things, esp material possessions: we currently live in an acquisitive society adj. 1630s, “owned through acquisition,” from Latin acquisit-, past participle stem of acquirere (see acquisition) + -ive. Meaning “given […]



  • Acquit

    to relieve from a charge of fault or crime; declare not guilty: They acquitted him of the crime. The jury acquitted her, but I still think she’s guilty. to release or discharge (a person) from an obligation. to settle or satisfy (a debt, obligation, claim, etc.). to bear or conduct (oneself); behave: He acquitted himself […]

  • Acquittal

    the act of ; discharge. the state of being ; release. the discharge or settlement of a debt, obligation, etc. Law. judicial deliverance from a criminal charge on a verdict or finding of not guilty. Contemporary Examples The acquittal of her former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito was also thrown out. Amanda Knox’s Acquittal Overturned: What’s Next? […]



Disclaimer: Acquisitiveness definition / meaning should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. All content on this website is for informational purposes only.