Administer



to manage (affairs, a government, etc.); have executive charge of:
to administer the law.
to bring into use or operation:
to administer justice; to administer last rites.
to make application of; give:
to administer medicine.
to supervise the formal taking of (an oath or the like).
Law. to manage or dispose of, as a decedent’s estate by an executor or or a trust estate by a trustee.
to contribute assistance; bring aid or supplies (usually followed by to):
to administer to the poor.
to perform the duties of an :
She administers quite effectively.
Contemporary Examples

We must be careful not to administer a vaccine against faith to them.
What Pope Francis Can Teach the GOP Sally Kohn January 5, 2014

Jones had Ricky Gervais administer electric shock to him during a segment.
The Anti-Ryan Seacrest Ramin Setoodeh November 8, 2011

Almost everyone except us is on a territorial system, and for good reason: it’s a lot simpler to administer and harder to game.
Congress to Grill Apple CEO About Taxes Megan McArdle May 20, 2013

As the medics came to administer aid, Kurth grabbed a radio and ordered a MedEvac helicopter.
Afghanistan’s Troop Killers Jessica Stone March 22, 2010

When Jerry Lee was taken home and his car was towed from the ditch, the deputies forgot to administer a test for intoxication.
The Strange and Mysterious Death of Mrs. Jerry Lee Lewis Richard Ben Cramer January 10, 2014

Historical Examples

“And qualified to administer an oath and take your deposition,” said the minister.
Hidden Hand Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth

They administer stinging rebukes that leave the adversary writhing.
The Spenders Harry Leon Wilson

He was called upon, not merely to administer the government, but to decide in the face of terrible odds, the fate of the Republic.
Masterpieces of Negro Eloquence Various

“What we want is to administer a tonic to the Conference in Milan,” he said airily.
The Secret Agent Joseph Conrad

All the remedies which the best medical advice could administer proved unavailing.
Louis Philippe John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott

verb (mainly transitive)
(also intransitive) to direct or control (the affairs of a business, government, etc)
to put into execution; dispense: administer justice
when intr, foll by to. to give or apply (medicine, assistance, etc) as a remedy or relief
to apply formally; perform: to administer extreme unction
to supervise or impose the taking of (an oath, etc)
to manage or distribute (an estate, property, etc)
v.

late 14c., administren, aministren “to manage as a steward,” from Old French amenistrer “help, aid, be of service to” (12c., Modern French administrer, the -d- restored 16c.), and directly from Latin administrare “manage, control, guide, superintend; rule direct,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + ministrare “serve” (see minister (v.)). Used of medicine, etc., “to give,” from 1540s. Related: Administered; administering.

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    a price that is determined administratively rather than by changes in supply and demand.

  • Administerial

    of or concerned with administration; administrative: administerial matters.



  • Administering

    to manage (affairs, a government, etc.); have executive charge of: to administer the law. to bring into use or operation: to administer justice; to administer last rites. to make application of; give: to administer medicine. to supervise the formal taking of (an oath or the like). Law. to manage or dispose of, as a decedent’s […]

  • Administrable

    capable of being : a bureaucracy so vast that it’s no longer administrable.



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