Admonishing



to caution, advise, or counsel against something.
to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner:
The teacher admonished him about excessive noise.
to urge to a duty; remind:
to admonish them about their obligations.
Contemporary Examples

He made an admonishing speech to Wall Street last week, but it was a day late and a trillion dollars short.
Why Mouthing Off Is All the Rage Tina Brown September 20, 2009

Historical Examples

Still I know that newly engaged girls and brides have to listen to a lot of admonishing from their female relatives.
At the Age of Eve Kate Trimble Sharber

Sometimes Jukes would break in, admonishing hastily: “Look out, sir!”
Typhoon Joseph Conrad

Despard looked up and shook an admonishing finger at his acclaimer.
The Pursuit Frank (Frank Mackenzie) Savile

She swept an admonishing glance towards the others as she did so.
The Bondwoman Marah Ellis Ryan

The Marquise held up an admonishing finger and glanced towards the door.
The Bondwoman Marah Ellis Ryan

Sterne is admonishing a young friend as to his manners in society: “You are in love,” he says.
Robert Elsmere Mrs. Humphry Ward

I am sure, Mr. Linden, that the moralist is right in admonishing us to prefer the gold to the tinsel.
The Disowned, Complete Edward Bulwer-Lytton

He met their anxious, admonishing glances, unable to interpret them.
The Hill Horace Annesley Vachell

Jerry nodded an admonishing head in the direction from whence the musical sounds had come.
Marjorie Dean College Freshman Pauline Lester

verb (transitive)
to reprove firmly but not harshly
to advise to do or against doing something; warn; caution
v.

mid-14c., amonesten “remind, urge, exhort, warn, give warning,” from Old French amonester (12c.) “urge, encourage, warn,” from Vulgar Latin *admonestare, from Latin admonere “bring to mind, remind, suggest;” also “warn, advise, urge,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + monere “advise, warn” (see monitor (n.)).

The -d- was restored on Latin model. The ending was influenced by words in -ish (e.g. astonish, abolish). Related: Admonished; admonishing.

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  • Admonishment

    to caution, advise, or counsel against something. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations. Contemporary Examples He spoke to his co-defendant throughout the hearing despite the admonishment of the female judge. London’s […]

  • Admonition

    an act of . counsel, advice, or caution. a gentle reproof. a warning or reproof given by an ecclesiastical authority. Contemporary Examples Kelly’s admonition of the film through an aide‚ years after the fact, doesn’t go down well. Ray Kelly’s Dalliance With The Islamophobic Fringes Ali Gharib July 18, 2013 His admonition last week to […]



  • Admonitor

    an admonisher. Historical Examples There is also an admonitor who sees that the General governs according to the laws of the Society and for the common good. The Jesuits, 1534-1921 Thomas J. Campbell

  • Admonitory

    tending or serving to ; warning: an admonitory gesture. Historical Examples On this especial August evening Mrs. Frank was in an admonitory frame of mind. Found in the Philippines Charles King Deeply affecting and admonitory are some of the instances he records. The Hero of the Humber Henry Woodcock Indeed, the history of the Church […]



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