Agitate



to move or force into violent, irregular action:
The hurricane winds agitated the sea.
to shake or move briskly:
The machine agitated the mixture.
to move to and fro; impart regular motion to.
to disturb or excite emotionally; arouse; perturb:
a crowd agitated to a frenzy by impassioned oratory; a man agitated by disquieting news.
to call attention to by speech or writing; discuss; debate:
to agitate the question.
to consider on all sides; revolve in the mind; plan.
to arouse or attempt to arouse public interest and support, as in some political or social cause or theory:
to agitate for the repeal of a tax.
Contemporary Examples

Zamora was handsome, passionate, and used his time on The Real World to educate and agitate.
Pedro Zamora, a Hero in the Real World Tim Teeman May 31, 2014

Their leaders said some 20,000 people turned out to agitate in the Russian capital; officials put the number lower, around 8,000.
Neo-Nationalist Violence Targets Central Asians In Russia Anna Nemtsova November 5, 2013

When they are out of power Republicans agitate to cut taxes and oppose tax increases.
Fiscal Cliff Vote Fails Due to Republican Theology on Taxes Daniel Gross December 20, 2012

An American first lady was embracing a brand known for its willingness to push boundaries, to agitate, and even to offend.
Michelle Obama in Alexander McQueen: Lady in Red Robin Givhan January 18, 2011

He is always calling on “we,” “the population,” or “the people” to rally in the streets and agitate for a better future.
Noam Chomsky—Infuriating and Necessary David Masciotra September 27, 2014

Historical Examples

Now, my dear sir, as to the questions which agitate the 101 minds of thousands in your country.
Early Western Travels 1748-1846, Volume X Various

In 1831, a movement was on foot to agitate the question of abolishing slavery.
Cleveland Past and Present Maurice Joblin

We cannot be judges of his policy, or the great events which agitate Europe.
Tom Burke Of “Ours”, Volume II (of II) Charles James Lever

I see how the questions that agitate this country interest you.
Lord Kilgobbin Charles Lever

“I beg of you not to so agitate yourself,” said Elvira Gordon.
Madelon Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

verb
(transitive) to excite, disturb, or trouble (a person, the mind, or feelings); worry
(transitive) to cause to move vigorously; shake, stir, or disturb
(intransitive; often foll by for or against) to attempt to stir up public opinion for or against something
(transitive) to discuss or debate in order to draw attention to or gain support for (a cause, etc): to agitate a political cause
v.

1580s, “to disturb,” from Latin agitatus, past participle of agitare “to put in constant motion, drive onward, impel,” frequentative of agere “to move, drive” (see agitation). Literal sense of “move to and fro, shake” is from 1590s. Related: Agitated; agitating.

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  • Agitated

    excited; disturbed. to move or force into violent, irregular action: The hurricane winds agitated the sea. to shake or move briskly: The machine agitated the mixture. to move to and fro; impart regular motion to. to disturb or excite emotionally; arouse; perturb: a crowd agitated to a frenzy by impassioned oratory; a man agitated by […]



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