one of the Graces.
Historical Examples

In her babyhood Aglaia herself repudiated the name, as far as common use went, and persisted in calling herself “Dums.”
Sixes and Sevens O. Henry

One day, only a week after her fourth birthday, Aglaia disappeared.
Sixes and Sevens O. Henry

The delight of the miller’s life was his little daughter, Aglaia.
Sixes and Sevens O. Henry

The Aglaia figured with distinction in the great Mackinaw salvage-case.
The Day’s Work, Volume 1 Rudyard Kipling

Aglaia was so delighted with it that she resolved to take it as a present to Glaucon.
The Story Girl Lucy Maud Montgomery

But when we reached home, Aglaia, our governess, saw what had come to us.
Puck of Pook’s Hill Rudyard Kipling

They were invoked at festivals, and three cups were drunk by those who feasted in honour of Euphrosyne, Aglaia, and Thalia.
Heathen Mythology Various

But he did not play as much as he used to, because he liked better to talk with Aglaia.
The Story Girl Lucy Maud Montgomery

The note that she struck had beaten down the doors of a closed memory; and Father Abram held his lost Aglaia close in his arms.
Sixes and Sevens O. Henry

The miller and his wife often tried to coax from Aglaia the source of this mysterious name, but without results.
Sixes and Sevens O. Henry

(Greek myth) one of the three Graces

one of the Graces, Greek, literally “splendor, beauty, brightness,” from aglaos “splendid, beautiful, bright,” of unknown origin.


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