a heavier-than-air aircraft kept aloft by the upward thrust exerted by the passing air on its fixed wings and driven by propellers, jet propulsion, etc.
any similar heavier-than-air aircraft, as a glider or helicopter.
Contemporary Examples

It measures air speed—not ground speed, but the speed of the airplane at altitude.
Air France 447 Report: How the Plane Went Down Clive Irving July 4, 2012

He crafted an outline of an airplane and filled it with water so it darkened like a shadow.
The 2013 Artist Sand Castle Competition Hosted by Creative Time (PHOTOS) Isabel Wilkinson August 10, 2013

There is a large area to be scoured and the amount of time the airplane can spend over its assigned zone is critical.
Was MH370 Carrying Killer Cargo? Clive Irving March 20, 2014

In other words, what could have brought the airplane to the point where it headed off to its fate?
How Flight 370 Could Have Become a Zombie Clive Irving March 18, 2014

Fire aboard an airplane is anathema to airplane designers and airlines.
Planes in Flames: Why Does It Keep Happening? Clive Irving July 14, 2013

Historical Examples

Paris was filled with amazement and delight at the sight of an airplane soaring over the city.
The Romance of Aircraft Lawrence Yard Smith

You will take me back in my airplane, and you will land me at Punta Arenas.
Astounding Stories of Super-Science, August 1930 Various

Our new book, Opportunities in the airplane industry also sent free if you answer at once.
Astounding Stories of Super-Science February 1930 Various

I’ll do a parachute jump into the sky, and land on an airplane!
Disowned Victor Endersby

The airplane service was the only part of the work wholly new to the men, and, naturally enough, it was the most attractive.
Our Army at the Front Heywood Broun

(US & Canadian) a heavier-than-air powered flying vehicle with fixed wings Also called aeroplane

1907, from air (n.1) + plane (n.1); though the original references are British, the word caught on in American English, where it largely superseded earlier aeroplane (1873 in this sense and still common in British English). Aircraft “airplane” also is from 1907. Lord Byron, speculatively, used air-vessel (1822).


A tweezerlike clip for holding a marijuana cigarette stub; roach clip


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