Anabasis



a march from the coast into the interior, as that of Cyrus the Younger against Artaxerxes II, described by Xenophon in his historical work Anabasis (379–371 b.c.).
Literary. any military expedition or advance.
Historical Examples

Two months later, Theodora was reading the anabasis, while Hubert was still toiling over the intricacies of the irregular verb.
Teddy: Her Book Anna Chapin Ray

At Scillus he wrote probably his “anabasis” and some other of his books.
The Memorable Thoughts of Socrates Xenophon

The Cyropædia and anabasis of Xenophon are nothing but historical romances.
Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 58, No. 359, September 1845 Various

The account of the “Retreat” is given in Xenophon’s anabasis.
The Mormon Battalion B. H. (Brigham Henry) Roberts

Xenophon’s own strategy in the anabasis is probably the prototype.
Cyropaedia Xenophon

These were the gorges that drove Xenophon to take to the mountains in the anabasis.
The Cradle of Mankind W.A. Wigram

Our knowledge of his personal history begins with what he himself recounts in the anabasis.
Plato and the Other Companions of Sokrates, 3rd ed. Volume I (of 4) George Grote

Of all his writings, his anabasis has been pronounced the most remarkable.
Stories of Great Men Faye Huntington

In what does the main interest of the anabasis as a narrative lie?
The Chautauquan, Vol. III, December 1882 The Chautauquan Literary and Scientific Circle

When we started off on the advance I was reading Xenophon’s anabasis.
War in the Garden of Eden Kermit Roosevelt

noun (pl) -ses (-ˌsiːz)
the march of Cyrus the Younger and his Greek mercenaries from Sardis to Cunaxa in Babylonia in 401 bc, described by Xenophon in his Anabasis Compare katabasis
any military expedition, esp one from the coast to the interior
n.

1706, from Greek, “military expedition,” literally “a going up (from the coast),” especially in reference to the advance of Cyrus the Younger from near the Aegean coast into Asia, and the subsequent story of the retreat of the 10,000 narrated by Xenophon (401 B.C.E.), from anabainein “to go up, mount;” from ana “up” (see ana-) + bainein “to go” (see come).

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