Aniline



Also called aniline oil, aminobenzine, phenylamine. Chemistry. a colorless, oily, slightly water-soluble liquid, C 6 H 5 NH 2 , usually derived from nitrobenzene by reduction: used chiefly in the synthesis of dyes and drugs.
pertaining to or derived from aniline:
aniline colors.
Historical Examples

Let us now take the case of the production of an aniline colour, and let us try to discover what aniline is, and how formed.
The Chemistry of Hat Manufacturing Watson Smith

For what are aniline, paraffine, naphtha, and carbolic acid used?
Commercial Geography Jacques W. Redway

It can be dyed easily, and with little expense, with Diamond or aniline dyes.
Hand-Loom Weaving Mattie Phipps Todd

A woman is worth more than to be subordinated to an aniline dye.
The Strand Magazine, Volume I, Issue 2, February 1891 Various

The symptoms closely resemble those of aniline poisoning, but there is perhaps greater mental confusion.
Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology W. G. Aitchison Robertson

How does its application to wood effect the color and value of aniline stain?
Industrial Arts Design William H. Varnum

Concentrated hydrochloric acid converts it into chlorbenzene, aniline and nitrogen.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 4 Various

But aniline was of use to others besides the theoretical chemist.
Michael Faraday J. H. Gladstone

The alpha-compound is made in precisely the same way as aniline, viz.
Coal Raphael Meldola

If some special color is desired, tint the mixture with aniline.
The Boy Mechanic, Book 2 Various

noun
a colourless oily pungent poisonous liquid used in the manufacture of dyes, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and explosives. Formula: C6H5NH2 Also called phenylamine
n.

chemical base used in making colorful dyes, 1843, coined 1841 by German chemist Carl Julius Fritzsche (1808-1871) and adopted by Hofmann, ultimately from Portuguese anil “the indigo shrub,” from Arabic an-nil “the indigo,” assimilated from al-nil, from Persian nila, ultimately from Sanskrit nili “indigo,” from nilah “dark blue.” With chemical suffix -ine (2).

aniline an·i·line or an·i·lin (ān’ə-lĭn)
n.
An oily, poisonous benzene derivative used in the manufacture of dyes and pharmaceuticals. adj.
Derived from aniline.
aniline
(ān’ə-lĭn)
A colorless, oily, poisonous compound used in the manufacture of rubber, dyes, resins, pharmaceuticals, and varnishes. Aniline is an amine of benzene. Chemical formula: C6H7N.

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  • Anilin

    Also called aniline oil, aminobenzine, phenylamine. Chemistry. a colorless, oily, slightly water-soluble liquid, C 6 H 5 NH 2 , usually derived from nitrobenzene by reduction: used chiefly in the synthesis of dyes and drugs. pertaining to or derived from aniline: aniline colors. Historical Examples Practically all bacteriological stains are solutions of the anilin dyes. […]

  • Anilinction

    anilinction anilinction a·ni·linc·tion (ā’nə-lĭngk’shən) or a·ni·linc·tus (-lĭngk’təs) n. Sexual stimulation by licking or kissing the anus.



  • Aniline black

    the black dye obtained by the oxidation of aniline hydrochloride, used for dyeing textiles, especially cotton. Historical Examples As a consequence, the methods of dyeing furs with aniline black have also become simpler and more efficient. Principles and Practice of Fur Dressing and Fur Dyeing William E. Austin aniline black is the name given to […]

  • Aniline dye

    any of a large number of synthetic dyes derived from aniline, usually obtained from coal tar. Historical Examples Candy is commonly colored with aniline dye and often coated with paraffine to prevent evaporation. The Holy Earth L. H. Bailey A woman is worth more than to be subordinated to an aniline dye. The Strand Magazine, […]



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