a Mediterranean plant, Pimpinella anisum, of the parsley family, having loose umbrels of small yellowish-white flowers that yield .
Contemporary Examples

Another variation replaces the anise with candied fruits like oranges, pineapples, and figs.
Secrets of Día de los Muertos Ana Sofia Pelaez October 26, 2009

The potatoes, fennel, anise, and garlic perfectly complement the brininess of the seafood.
Fresh Picks George Mendes September 6, 2010

At first, the taste is bright and mostly of fennel, then it slides into anise, and then fades away with a minty finish.
The Absinthe-Minded Porteños of Buenos Aires Jeff Campagna March 9, 2014

Historical Examples

A cup of water from a spring, with some laurel leaves and anise floating in it, is all that she needs.
The Red Romance Book Various

This preparation is said to be composed of hygiama,116 galega and anise.
The Propaganda for Reform in Proprietary Medicines, Vol. 2 of 2 Various

I have bought scent for many years, but the best scent I can find is skunk essence or oil of anise.
Fox Trapping A. R. (Arthur Robert) Harding

Oil of anise or rhodium is sometimes used for the same purpose.
Coyotes in Their Economic Relations David E. Lantz

They had never heard of this use for oil of anise, and they were full of curiosity as to the outcome of the experiment.
The Pony Rider Boys in New England Frank Gee Patchin

anise (anis; Pimpinella Anīsum), an annual plant of the nat.
The New Gresham Encyclopedia. Vol. 1 Part 2 Various

The anise (Pimpinella anisum) is largely cultivated in Spain, where it is known as anis.
The Bible in Spain – Vol. 2 [of 2] George Borrow

a Mediterranean umbelliferous plant, Pimpinella anisum, having clusters of small yellowish-white flowers and liquorice-flavoured seeds See aniseed

Levantine plant cultivated for its seeds, which were important sources of chemical oils and flavoring, c.1300, from Old French anis (13c.), from Latin anisum, from Greek anison. By the Ancients, somewhat confused with dill.

This word is found only in Matt. 23:23. It is the plant commonly known by the name of dill, the Peucedanum graveolens of the botanist. This name dill is derived from a Norse word which means to soothe, the plant having the carminative property of allaying pain. The common dill, the Anethum graveolens, is an annual growing wild in the cornfields of Spain and Portugal and the south of Europe generally. There is also a species of dill cultivated in Eastern countries known by the name of shubit. It was this species of garden plant of which the Pharisees were in the habit of paying tithes. The Talmud requires that the seeds, leaves, and stem of dill shall pay tithes. It is an umbelliferous plant, very like the caraway, its leaves, which are aromatic, being used in soups and pickles. The proper anise is the Pimpinella anisum.


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