Applaud



to clap the hands as an expression of approval, appreciation, acclamation, etc.:
They applauded wildly at the end of the opera.
to express approval; give praise; acclaim.
to clap the hands so as to show approval, appreciation, etc., of:
to applaud an actor; to applaud a speech.
to praise or express approval of:
to applaud a person’s ambition.
Contemporary Examples

Even if we cannot applaud his actions, we can at least understand them.
Mark Sanford Is a Romantic Hero Ben Crair June 25, 2009

One could not help but applaud, even if the goal was grist to the glory-mill of the Dear Leader.
Can You Root for North Korea? Tunku Varadarajan June 14, 2010

The next stop comes, Carroll, and when the newbies with red white and blue balloons get on, we applaud and laugh again.
Subway Euphoria Jessi Klein November 4, 2008

Last week, Obama visited a Boeing plant to hype the lower tax-rate idea and applaud its job-creation acumen.
Obama’s Cut to the Corporate Tax Rate Is a Crafty Political Ploy Nomi Prins February 22, 2012

Sure, he still has a ways to go, but we have to applaud his efforts and sense of humor about the whole thing.
Chris Christie’s Weight Loss: The Lap-Band Procedure Explained Lizzie Crocker May 7, 2013

Historical Examples

He jumped on his feet, rising to his full height, and began to applaud with all his might.
At Start and Finish William Lindsey

Ernestine paused a moment that Miss Levering might applaud the new ‘helper.’ ‘
The Convert Elizabeth Robins

That is, at a concert they will not so applaud one artist as to break up the program.
The Etiquette of To-day Edith B. Ordway

I honour your innocence and applaud your approbation of sailors.
Yr Ynys Unyg Julia de Winton

Either to applaud the negro songs—or perhaps an ironical comment on the sorrow, anger, or style of the stock poets.
Complete Prose Works Walt Whitman

verb
to indicate approval of (a person, performance, etc) by clapping the hands
(usually transitive) to offer or express approval or praise of (an action, person, or thing): I applaud your decision
v.

late 15c. (implied in applauding), “to express agreement or approval; to praise,” from Latin applaudere “to clap the hands in approbation, to approve by clapping hands; to strike upon, beat,” from ad “to” (see ad-) + plaudere “to clap” (see plaudit). Sense of “express approval of” is from 1590s; that of “to clap the hands” is from 1590s. Figurative sense arrived in English before literal. Related: Applauded; applauding.

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  • Applaudable

    worthy of praise or ; estimable; admirable: applaudable efforts to save the environment.

  • Applause

    hand clapping as a demonstration of approval, appreciation, acclamation, or the like. any positive expression of appreciation or approval; acclamation. Contemporary Examples Neither do I. But, several rounds of applause and a standing ovation later, Les Misérables proved all the naysayers wrong. ‘Les Miserables’ Is New Frontrunner for Best Picture Oscar Marlow Stern November 25, […]



  • Applauds

    to clap the hands as an expression of approval, appreciation, acclamation, etc.: They applauded wildly at the end of the opera. to express approval; give praise; acclaim. to clap the hands so as to show approval, appreciation, etc., of: to applaud an actor; to applaud a speech. to praise or express approval of: to applaud […]

  • Applause meter

    noun a device for measuring and monitoring the duration and volume of applause during a broadcast; also UK clapometer Examples Television talk shows use applause meters to measure audience reaction.



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