Asphalting



any of various dark-colored, solid, bituminous substances, native in various areas of the earth and composed mainly of hydrocarbon mixtures.
a similar substance that is the by-product of petroleum-cracking operations.
a mixture of such substances with gravel, crushed rock, or the like, used for paving.
to cover or pave with asphalt.
of, relating to, or containing asphalt:
asphalt tile.
Historical Examples

When asphalting suspension bridges, a sheet of canvas is usually spread over the concrete.
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

In asphalting damp places, such as cellars and foundations, a brick invert is always laid in asphalt beneath the concrete.
Cooley’s Cyclopdia of Practical Receipts and Collateral Information in the Arts, Manufactures, Professions, and Trades…, Sixth Edition, Volume I Arnold Cooley

To remedy this, the asphalting was taken up and a Nicholson wood pavement was put down.
The Enchanted Typewriter John Kendrick Bangs

noun
any of several black semisolid substances composed of bitumen and inert mineral matter. They occur naturally in parts of America and as a residue from petroleum distillation: used as a waterproofing material and in paints, dielectrics, and fungicides
a mixture of this substance with gravel, used in road-surfacing and roofing materials
(modifier) containing or surfaced with asphalt
verb
(transitive) to cover with asphalt
n.

early 14c., “hard, resinous mineral pitch found originally in Biblical lands,” from Late Latin asphaltum, from Greek asphaltos “asphalt, bitumen,” probably from a non-Greek source, possibly Semitic [Klein, citing Lewy, 1895]. Another theory holds it to be from Greek a- “not” + *sphaltos “able to be thrown down,” taken as verbal adjective of sphallein “to throw down,” in reference to a use of the material in building.

Meaning “paving composition” dates from 1847 and its popular use in this sense established the modern form of the English word, mostly displacing asphaltum, asphaltos. As a verb meaning “to cover with asphalt,” from 1872.
asphalt
(ās’fôlt’)
A thick, sticky, dark-brown mixture of petroleum tars used in paving, roofing, and waterproofing. Asphalt is produced as a byproduct in refining petroleum or is found in natural beds.

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    a natural, solid hydrocarbon having a melting point higher than that of asphalt. noun any of various naturally occurring hydrocarbons that resemble asphalt but have a higher melting point

  • Asperation

    n. 1721, noun of action from asperate (v.). Asperacioun “harshness” is attested from early 15c.



  • Asperate

    to make rough, harsh, or uneven: a voice asperated by violent emotion. Historical Examples But in the ordinary life there in my time there was little to “asperate” the douceur. A History of the French Novel, Vol. 2 George Saintsbury adjective (of plant parts) having a rough surface due to a covering of short stiff […]

  • Asperating

    to make rough, harsh, or uneven: a voice asperated by violent emotion. adjective (of plant parts) having a rough surface due to a covering of short stiff hairs v. 1650s, “make rough,” from Latin asperatus, past participle of asperare “to roughen, make rough, exasperate,” from asper “rough” (see asperity). Related: Asperated; asperating.



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