Assailable



to attack vigorously or violently; assault.
to attack with arguments, criticism, ridicule, abuse, etc.:
to assail one’s opponent with slander.
to undertake with the purpose of mastering:
He assailed his studies with new determination.
to impinge upon; make an impact on; beset:
His mind was assailed by conflicting arguments. The light assailed their eyes.
Historical Examples

In these points we were “assailable;” we had “too long and too tenaciously” resisted British rights.
Martin Van Buren Edward M. Shepard

She was assailable;—and, as this was so, why the mischief should he not set about the work at once?
The Belton Estate Anthony Trollope

Yet Grenville apparently never dreamt that his position was assailable.
Farmer George, Volume 1 Lewis Melville

The north and west sides are the most assailable parts of the city.
Letters from Palestine J. D. Paxton

Martin was that species of man which, of all others, is most assailable by flattery.
The Martins Of Cro’ Martin, Vol. II (of II) Charles James Lever

It was a painful case; but the chain of inference was not assailable.
The Lord of the Sea M. P. Shiel

But he soon found that the position extended too far southward to be assailable by his limited forces.
The Relief of Mafeking Filson Young

I asked him to make the reconnoissance and designate the assailable points.
From Manassas to Appomattox James Longstreet

He prepared for both contingencies, posting careful men at every assailable point.
The Frontier Fort W. H. G. Kingston

In other words, Mrs. Sowler’s head was only assailable by hot grog, when hot grog was administered in large quantities.
The Fallen Leaves Wilkie Collins

verb (transitive)
to attack violently; assault
to criticize or ridicule vehemently, as in argument
to beset or disturb: his mind was assailed by doubts
to encounter with the intention of mastering: to assail a problem, to assail a difficult mountain ridge
v.

c.1200, from Old French assalir “attack, assault, assail” (12c., Modern French assaillir), from Vulgar Latin *adsalire “to leap at,” from Latin ad- “at” (see ad-) + salire “to leap” (see salient (adj.)). Figurative use from mid-14c. Related: Assailed; assailing; assailable.

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  • Assailing

    to attack vigorously or violently; assault. to attack with arguments, criticism, ridicule, abuse, etc.: to assail one’s opponent with slander. to undertake with the purpose of mastering: He assailed his studies with new determination. to impinge upon; make an impact on; beset: His mind was assailed by conflicting arguments. The light assailed their eyes. Contemporary […]



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    to attack vigorously or violently; assault. to attack with arguments, criticism, ridicule, abuse, etc.: to assail one’s opponent with slander. to undertake with the purpose of mastering: He assailed his studies with new determination. to impinge upon; make an impact on; beset: His mind was assailed by conflicting arguments. The light assailed their eyes. Historical […]

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    a group of former states in NE India, most of which are now part of the state of Assam.



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