Assimilating



to take in and incorporate as one’s own; absorb:
He assimilated many new experiences on his European trip.
to bring into conformity with the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like; adapt or adjust:
to assimilate the new immigrants.
Physiology. to convert (food) to substances suitable for incorporation into the body and its tissues.
to cause to resemble (usually followed by to or with).
to compare; liken (usually followed by to or with).
Phonetics. to modify by .
to be or become absorbed.
to conform or adjust to the customs, attitudes, etc., of a group, nation, or the like:
The new arrivals assimilated easily and quickly.
Physiology. (of food) to be converted into the substance of the body; be absorbed into the system.
to bear a resemblance (usually followed by to or with).
Phonetics. to become modified by .
something that is assimilated.
Contemporary Examples

Despite the 21 years I did in prison for a drug conviction, I am assimilating back into mainstream or, dare I say, white America.
Ferguson Tensions in Black and White Seth Ferranti November 20, 2014

There are no easy solutions to assimilating refugees into a solid culture.
The Ugly Side of Sweden Janine di Giovanni July 16, 2013

Historical Examples

But we also possess capacities other than these for assimilating and using a language.
The Principles of Language-Study Harold E. Palmer

He turned to the lake and consumed five minutes in assimilating her remark.
A Woman’s Will Anne Warner

The juice of lemons and other acid fruits is usually grateful, and assists in assimilating any excess in nutriment.
Searchlights on Health: Light on Dark Corners B.G. Jefferis

Or, as conventional as ever, our own method is the scientific method of assimilating.
The Book of the Damned Charles Fort

Historical truth is reached by balancing everything, and not by assimilating that which easily suits.
Christopher Columbus and How He Received and Imparted the Spirit of Discovery Justin Winsor

He is of the kind who drink in the life universal, assimilating it to themselves.
Handel Romain Rolland

This organism possesses also the power of assimilating the free nitrogen of the air.
The Organism as a Whole Jacques Loeb

Several of its members were in favour of assimilating Reform, 1867.
Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 9, Slice 5 Various

verb
(transitive) to learn (information, a procedure, etc) and understand it thoroughly
(transitive) to absorb (food) and incorporate it into the body tissues
(intransitive) to become absorbed, incorporated, or learned and understood
usually foll by into or with. to bring or come into harmony; adjust or become adjusted: the new immigrants assimilated easily
usually foll by to or with. to become or cause to become similar
(usually foll by to) (phonetics) to change (a consonant) or (of a consonant) to be changed into another under the influence of one adjacent to it: (n) often assimilates to ŋ before (k), as in “include”
v.

early 15c., from Latin assimilatus “feigned, pretended, fictitious,” past participle of assimilare “to make like,” from ad- “to” (see ad-) + simulare “make similar,” from similis “like, resembling” (see similar). Originally transitive (with to); intransitive use first recorded 1837. Related: Assimilated; assimilating.

assimilate as·sim·i·late (ə-sĭm’ə-lāt’)
v. as·sim·i·lat·ed, as·sim·i·lat·ing, as·sim·i·lates

To consume and incorporate nutrients into the body after digestion.

To transform food into living tissue by the process of anabolism.

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