Bandies



to pass from one to another or back and forth; give and take; trade; exchange:
to bandy blows; to bandy words.
to throw or strike to and fro or from side to side, as a ball in tennis.
to circulate freely:
to bandy gossip.
(of legs) having a bend or crook outward; bowed:
a new method for correcting bandy legs.
an early form of tennis.
Chiefly British. (formerly) hockey or shinny.
Obsolete. a hockey or shinny stick.
Historical Examples

They had a net to catch penguins, a club like to our bandies, and wooden darts.
History of the Buccaneers of America James Burney

It should make an end of the treacly farce which bandies between hopelessly parted colleagues the title ‘right hon. friend.’
Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 105, July 8th 1893 Various

Our baggage and bandies were also carried over in them, but the cattle of every kind were obliged to swim.
Narrative of the Life and Travels of Serjeant B—— Robert Butler

A game played by two persons, with bandies or sticks hooked at the end, and a bit of wood called a nacket.
The Traditional Games of England, Scotland, and Ireland (Vol II of II) Alice Bertha Gomme

A dialogue abounding in the passages I have already quoted—a dialogue which bandies ‘O you screech-owl!’
Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Second Series John Addington Symonds

adjective -dier, -diest
Also bandy-legged. having legs curved outwards at the knees
(of legs) curved outwards at the knees
(Austral, informal) knock someone bandy, to amaze or astound
verb (transitive) -dies, -dying, -died
to exchange (words) in a heated or hostile manner
to give and receive (blows)
(often foll by about) to circulate (a name, rumour, etc)
to throw or strike to and fro; toss about
noun (pl) -dies
an early form of hockey, often played on ice
a stick, curved at one end, used in the game of bandy
an old form of tennis
v.

1570s, “to strike back and forth,” from Middle French bander, from root of band (n.2). The sense apparently evolved from “join together to oppose,” to opposition itself, to “exchanging blows,” then metaphorically, to volleying in tennis. Bandy (n.) was a 17c. Irish game, precursor of field hockey, played with curved a stick (also called a bandy), hence bandy-legged (1680s).

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  • Bandy

    to pass from one to another or back and forth; give and take; trade; exchange: to bandy blows; to bandy words. to throw or strike to and fro or from side to side, as a ball in tennis. to circulate freely: to bandy gossip. (of legs) having a bend or crook outward; bowed: a new […]

  • Banding

    decorative inlay, as for bordering or paneling a piece, composed of strips of wood contrasting in grain or color with the principal wood of the surface. a company of persons or, sometimes, animals or things, joined, acting, or functioning together; aggregation; party; troop: a band of protesters. Music. a group of instrumentalists playing music of […]



  • Bandit

    a robber, especially a member of a gang or marauding band. an outlaw or highwayman. Informal. a person who takes unfair advantage of others, as a merchant who overcharges; swindler; cheat. a vendor, cab driver, etc., who operates a business or works without a required license or permit, and without observing the usual rules or […]

  • Bandito

    (especially in Mexico and Central America) an outlaw; bandit.



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