Banning



a city in S California, near Los Angeles.
to prohibit, forbid, or bar; interdict:
to ban nuclear weapons; The dictator banned all newspapers and books that criticized his regime.
Archaic.

to pronounce an ecclesiastical curse upon.
to curse; execrate.

the act of prohibiting by law; interdiction.
informal denunciation or prohibition, as by public opinion:
society’s ban on racial discrimination.
Law.

a proclamation.
a public condemnation.

Ecclesiastical. a formal condemnation; excommunication.
a malediction; curse.
Contemporary Examples

Banning women from sports stadiums began during the 1979 revolution.
Iran Won’t Let Women Watch The World Cup IranWire June 20, 2014

In the past, Perry has been committed to Banning abortion with very narrow exceptions.
Gingrich, Perry, Bachmann, and Santorum Go Extreme on Abortion Michelle Goldberg December 27, 2011

I have no idea; all I can say is that both these things would be more effective than Banning rifles with pistol grips.
There’s Little We Can Do to Prevent Another Massacre Megan McArdle December 16, 2012

I have no idea; all I can say is that both these things would be more effective than Banning rifles with pistol grips.
Can Collective Action Stop Mass Shooters? Megan McArdle December 17, 2012

Its approach of Banning 23andMe, however, did little to advance the cause of providing better genetic testing information.
23andMe and Me: Why Policymakers Should Set the Genetic Testing Company Free Charles C. Johnson February 3, 2014

Historical Examples

Mr. Cade ran in a substitute left end and a substitute left tackle then, and Banning slowed up.
Left Half Harmon Ralph Henry Barbour

I beetled it down to the nearest phone and got hold of my Banning number.
A Spaceship Named McGuire Gordon Randall Garrett

Banning suggested a sortie in force to intimidate the Dyaks.
The Argus Pheasant John Charles Beecham

A demand was made for the excommunication of the translator and the Banning of his work.
Greece J.A. McClymont

And yet, at heart she knew that to be already looking forward, Banning the present, was a bad sign.
Beyond John Galsworthy

verb bans, banning, banned
(transitive) to prohibit, esp officially, from action, display, entrance, sale, etc; forbid: to ban a book, to ban smoking
(transitive) (formerly in South Africa) to place (a person suspected of illegal political activity) under a government order restricting his movement and his contact with other people
(archaic) to curse
noun
an official prohibition or interdiction
(law) an official proclamation or public notice, esp of prohibition
a public proclamation or edict, esp of outlawry
(archaic) public censure or condemnation
(archaic) a curse; imprecation
noun
(in feudal England) the summoning of vassals to perform their military obligations
noun (pl) bani (ˈbɑːnɪ)
a monetary unit of Romania and Moldova worth one hundredth of a leu
v.

Old English bannan “to summon, command, proclaim,” from Proto-Germanic *bannan “proclaim, command, forbid” (cf. Old High German bannan “to command or forbid under threat of punishment,” German bannen “banish, expel, curse”), originally “to speak publicly,” from PIE root *bha- (2) “to speak” (cf. Old Irish bann “law,” Armenian ban “word;” see fame (n.)).

Main modern sense of “to prohibit” (late 14c.) is from Old Norse cognate banna “to curse, prohibit,” and probably in part from Old French ban, which meant “outlawry, banishment,” among other things (see banal) and was a borrowing from Germanic. The sense evolution in Germanic was from “speak” to “proclaim a threat” to (in Norse, German, etc.) “curse.”

The Germanic root, borrowed in Latin and French, has been productive, e.g. banish, bandit, contraband, etc. Related: Banned; banning. Banned in Boston dates from 1920s, in allusion to the excessive zeal and power of that city’s Watch and Ward Society.
n.

“edict of prohibition,” c.1300, “proclamation or edict of an overlord,” from Old English (ge)bann “proclamation, summons, command” and Old French ban, both from Germanic; see ban (v.).

“governor of Croatia,” from Serbo-Croatian ban “lord, master, ruler,” from Persian ban “prince, lord, chief, governor,” related to Sanskrit pati “guards, protects.” Hence banat “district governed by a ban,” with Latinate suffix -atus. The Persian word got into Slavic perhaps via the Avars.

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  • Roger bannister

    Sir Roger (Gilbert) born 1929, English track and field athlete: first to run a mile in less than four minutes. noun Sir Roger (Gilbert). born 1929, British athlete and doctor: first man to run a mile in under four minutes (1954)

  • Bannisters

    banister. a baluster. Sometimes, banisters. the balustrade of a staircase. Historical Examples This best of stage seamen since bannisters time was born in 1780, and died only recently. Haunted London Walter Thornbury Then up she’d be coming, step by step, houlding on to the bannisters, dot and carry one. The Manxman Hall Caine I slid […]



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