[moh-rees] /moʊˈris/ (Show IPA), 1862–1923, French novelist, writer on politics, and politician.
a handrail placed at hip height, used by a dancer to maintain balance during practice.
Textiles. a pattern of stripes or bands of color extending across the warp in woven and knitted fabrics.
Textiles. a streak in the filling direction when one or more picks are of a color different from that of adjacent picks.
Music. a technique of playing a chord on a stringed instrument by laying a finger across the strings at a particular fret, raising their pitch.
Historical Examples

And barres, now intensely curious, walked eastward once more, following all three.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

The Vicomte des barres rose from his chair and lounged into the middle of the room.
Angelot Eleanor Price

Dulcie impulsively caressed the Prophet, who turned his solemn, incandescent eyes on barres.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

It was hard to concentrate; her thoughts were straying, now, to barres.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

Thessalie, laughingly engaged with barres, remained oblivious to the fashionable portrait painter.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

barres took her to the studio door, then returned to the table with the group of men.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

Renoux glanced curiously at barres, who had turned very red and was beginning to re-read the wireless.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

Her gaze was lifted to barres, who bent over her in jesting conversation.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

barres and Westmore exchanged conversation between their open doors while bathing and dressing.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

I guess that was the only way—if she was really going to take it up to young barres.
The Moonlit Way Robert W. Chambers

a rail at hip height used for ballet practice and leg exercises
the act of laying the index finger over some or all of the strings of a guitar, lute, or similar instrument, so that the pitch of each stopped string is simultaneously raised Compare capo1
the playing of chords in this manner
to execute (chords) in this manner
by using the barré
Maurice (mɔris). 1862–1923, French novelist, essayist, and politician: a fervent nationalist and individualist

1876, in reference to chords played on a guitar, etc., from French, literally “bar” (see bar (n.1)).


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